Arts

4:02pm

Mon March 10, 2014
The Salt

Freshly Baked Art: Cookies That Are A Feast For The Eyes

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 1:52 pm

Rebecca Weld (aka The Cookie Architect) nabbed the Oscar of the cookie world for this series of Nantucket-themed biscuits.
Courtesy of Rebecca Weld via Cookie Connection

Rebecca Weld of Potsdam, N.Y., makes her living as an architect. But during her free time, she's hunched over the kitchen counter, like an alchemist, dripping food coloring drop by drop into icing to achieve the perfect color.

"I use rich colors for that dated, antique feel," Weld says.

Antique? Perhaps. But certainly not old school. Weld's cookie designs are astonishingly intricate — including a scene from an Adirondacks lake that looks like you could dive right into it.

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2:01pm

Mon March 10, 2014
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Dunkin' Donuts Eggs Benedict Breakfast Sandwich

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 1:08 pm

Portable Eggs Benedict is a real blow to the already-suffering fork industry.
NPR

Making foods portable has long been a focus of food engineers. Gogurt did it for Yogurt, the McLeash made it easier to drag all your favorite McDonald's foods along with you. And now, by turning the open-faced sandwich closed and upping the viscosity of its Hollandaise, Dunkin' Donuts has brought portability to Eggs Benedict.

Miles: The full name is Eggs Benedict Arnold, because this sandwich is a traitor to everything breakfast should stand for.

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1:45pm

Mon March 10, 2014
Author Interviews

'Blood Will Out' Reveals Secrets Of A Murderous Master Manipulator

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:02 pm

The FBI pulled fingerprints off decades-old immigration papers to find Clark Rockefeller's true identity.
Lisa Poole AP

Let's say you meet a Rockefeller — Clark Rockefeller — and suddenly you have this connection to a world of wealth and privilege. Or so you think, because one day you find out he's an imposter. And not just an imposter — a murderer.

That's what happened to Walter Kirn, and Kirn's a smart guy — he's a journalist and the author of two novels that have been adapted into films, Up In The Air and Thumbsucker. How he was deceived, and what the consequences were, is the subject of Kirn's new memoir, Blood Will Out.

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12:50pm

Mon March 10, 2014
The Salt

The Upside Of All This Cold? A Boom In Ice Cider

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:41 pm

The icy winter is just what's needed for tasty ice cider.
Herb Swanson for NPR

If there's anything most of us are tired of this winter, it's bone-chilling cold.
It's enough to drive you to drink.

Literally. Because frigid weather is just what some enterprising artisans need to make a dessert wine that has been showing up on trendy tables and menus. Ice cider was invented in Quebec in the 1990s.

This time of year, it's fermenting on the other side of the border as well, as a few snowy states try to tap into the locavore market and turn perishables into profits.

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10:11am

Mon March 10, 2014
Code Switch

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:26 pm

Martin Luther King Jr., shown here with Stokely Carmichael during a voter registration march in Mississippi in 1966, regarded the younger Carmichael as one of the civil rights movement's most promising leaders.
Lynn Pelham Time

Before he became famous — and infamous — for calling on black power for black people, Stokely Carmichael was better known as a rising young community organizer in the civil rights movement. The tall, handsome philosophy major from Howard University spent summers in the South, working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC, to get African-Americans in Alabama and Mississippi registered to vote in the face of tremendous, often violent resistance from segregationists.

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9:53am

Mon March 10, 2014
Monkey See

Part Beauty, Part Hooey: That's A Wrap On 'True Detective'

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 1:26 pm

Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) had a lot to say about life, philosophy and beer on HBO's True Detective, which wrapped its first season Sunday night.
Lacey Terrell HBO

[This piece contains a detailed discussion of Sunday night's True Detective finale. If you haven't seen it and you plan to see it and you don't want to know what happens, stop reading.]

[Seriously, information ahoy.]

Spoiler alert: The dirty-faced, crazy-talking, disheveled impoverished guy did it.

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7:27am

Mon March 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Ned O'Gorman, Poet And Founder Of Harlem School, Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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3:04am

Mon March 10, 2014
Asia

'Sherlock,' 'House Of Cards' Top China's Must-Watch List

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Plot lines adorn the walls of 221B Baker Street, a Sherlock Holmes-themed coffee shop in Shanghai.
Frank Langfitt NPR

What do an eccentric British detective, a cut-throat Washington pol and a bunch of nerds at Caltech have in common?

They are characters in some of the most popular foreign TV shows in China.

Over the past five years, The Big Bang Theory alone has been streamed more than 1.3 billion times. To appreciate how much some young Chinese love the BBC series, Sherlock, step inside 221B Baker Street. That's Holmes' fictitious address in London as well as the name of a café that opened last year in Shanghai's former French Concession.

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5:23pm

Sun March 9, 2014
Author Interviews

'Boy, Snow, Bird' Takes A Closer Look Into The Fairy Tale Mirror

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 7:00 pm

Helen Oyeyemi's previous books include Mr. Fox and The Icarus Girl.
Piotr Cieplak Penguin Group

Boy, Snow, Bird reimagines the traditional Snow White fairy tale. Helen Oyeyemi's new novel explores beauty, envy and identity in New England in the 1950s — race and skin color shape the characters' experiences.

The wicked stepmother in this story is named Boy; the fair beauty is Snow. The birth of Snow's half-sister, Bird, reveals a long-buried family secret. Throughout the book, characters are haunted by a sense that things are not as they appear in their relationships and in the outside world.

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2:36pm

Sun March 9, 2014
The Salt

A Theme Park For Foodies? Italians Say Bologna

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 1:53 pm

Customers dine at the original Eataly in Turin, Italy, which opened in 2007.
demoshelsinki/Flickr

Italy has more UNESCO world heritage sites than any other country in the world, and its art and cultural riches have drawn visitors for centuries.

It also prides itself on being a culinary mecca, where preparing, cooking and serving meals is a fine, even sacred, art. And now that the country is in the deepest and most protracted recession since World War II, why not cash in on its reputation as a paradise for visiting gourmets and gourmands?

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