Arts

12:24pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Barbershop

Avoiding The Border: Is This Obama's Hurricane Katrina?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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12:24pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Music

Expat Producer Finds A Sense Of 'Home' In Music

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now as this program winds down - the last broadcast is scheduled for August 1 - we thought it would be nice to hear about the music members of our staff are listening to as part of our series, In Your Ear. Producer Freddie Boswell has spent most of her life living and traveling outside of the U.S. from Kenya and Tanzania to (unintelligible) and England, and that definitely informs what's on her playlist.

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12:24pm

Fri July 11, 2014
Faith Matters

In Troubled Times, Find Freedom Through Faith And Forgiveness

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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11:41am

Fri July 11, 2014
The Two-Way

Fly Like An Eagle: Site Picks The Best Aerial Drone Photos

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 12:15 pm

An eagle flies over Bali's Barat National Park, in this award-winning image taken by a camera attached to a drone.
capungaero Dronestagram

An eagle soars above a national park in Bali, Indonesia. A waterfall in Mexico is seen from above its shelf of cascading water. Those are the top two finishers in a contest held to find the best images captured by cameras mounted on aerial drones. The winners were recently unveiled by the site Dronestagram.

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7:53am

Fri July 11, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Singapore Pulls 2 Children's Books With Gay Couples From Libraries

And Tango Makes Three, co-written by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, illustrated by Henry Cole.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Monkey See

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 7:27 pm

Mindy Kaling and Carson Daly announce nominations for The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards Thursday morning.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

There are things you could quibble about in the array of nominations announced today for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards.

No best drama series nomination for CBS' The Good Wife, though several stars got acting nods. No acting nomination for Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, though she plays about eight different roles on BBC America's clone-focused adventure drama. No best variety show nod for John Oliver's increasingly stellar Last Week Tonight on HBO. And a best TV miniseries nod for Lifetime's dreadful Bonnie and Clyde?

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6:03pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Clerical Error Puts Church On New York's 'George Carlin Way'

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 11:41 am

George Carlin opens the 13th annual U.S. Comedy Arts Festival at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen, Colo., in 2007, a year before his death at age 71.
E. Pablo Kosmicki AP

The Corpus Christi Church in Manhattan, where iconoclastic comedian George Carlin once attended school and which he later ridiculed in some of his monologues, has a new street address: George Carlin Way.

The New York Times calls what's being described as a clerical error "an irony of Carlinesque proportions." The church fought a street named after the comedian since the idea was proposed three years ago.

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5:43pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Code Switch

In Stories Of Muslim Identity, Playwright Explores Fault Lines Of Faith

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 12:18 pm

Between Eli and Zarina (Greg Keller and Nadine Malouf), a family's Muslim faith undergoes rupture and renewal.
Erin Baiano Courtesy of Lincoln Center Theater

Ayad Akhtar is a novelist, actor and screenwriter. And when his first play, Disgraced, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2013, he also became one of the most talked about new voices in American theater.

Long before this buzz, though, Akhtar grew up in a Muslim family with roots in Pakistan. He mines this background to bring the inner lives and conflicts of Muslim Americans to the stage. His plays often feature cutting dialogue and confrontations steeped in the tension between Islamic tradition and personal evolution.

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5:31pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Movie Reviews

'Land Ho!' Takes An Agreeable Stroll Through Familiar And Unfamiliar Terrain

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:49 am

Mitch, a vulgar and cheery retired surgeon played by Earl Lynn Nelson, buys two plane tickets to Iceland, reviving the friendship between and sense of adventure in him and his ex-brother-in-law.
Sony Pictures Classics

In a more market-driven neighborhood of the movie business, Martha Stephens and Aaron Katz's comedy about two retired gents let loose on Iceland would surely be released under the title Geezers Do Geysers. And the modestly budgeted, charming Land Ho! is a caper of sorts, made less in snooty-indie opposition to the Grumpy Old Men franchise than as a fond goosing of the buddy movie, plus kooky innovation.

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5:03pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Movie Reviews

A 'Closed Curtain' Conceals A Director's Real Confinement

Filmmaker Jafar Panahi wrote, directed and produced Closed Curtain — a film based off his own personal experiences in hiding with his dog from the Iranian government.
Celluloid Dreams Variance Films

Banned Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi could hardly have found a more engaging surrogate than the four-legged co-star of Closed Curtain, the second movie Panahi has directed since he was officially forbidden from doing so. Making his entrance by hopping from the duffel bag that's hidden him, the dog called Boy embodies Iranian outcasts at their friskiest.

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