Arts

3:05pm

Thu April 16, 2015
The Two-Way

Yoda? Is It Thou? Figure In 14th-Century Manuscript Looks Familiar

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 3:34 pm

A religious volume from the early 1300s includes this image of a monk who resembles the Jedi Master Yoda of the Star Wars films.
The Britsh Library

A long time ago, in a place far away, a manuscript was created with an enigmatic figure who looks a great deal like a certain little — and yet powerful — green guy from the Star Wars films. It's an unlikely connection between a religious tome and science fiction.

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2:31pm

Thu April 16, 2015
The Salt

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:16 pm

In the Fortune Garden kitchen in El Centro, Calif., near the Mexican border, cooks speak to each other in Cantonese, and waiters give orders in Spanish.
Courtesy of Vickie Ly/KQED

If you ask people in the city of Mexicali, Mexico, about their most notable regional cuisine, they won't say street tacos or mole. They'll say Chinese food. There are as many as 200 Chinese restaurants in the city.

North of the border, in California's rural Imperial County, the population is mostly Latino, but Chinese restaurants are packed. There are dishes in this region you won't find anywhere else, and the history behind them goes back more than 130 years.

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10:03am

Thu April 16, 2015
Book Reviews

'Natural Born Heroes' Is Self-Help The Special Operations Way

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:16 am

In April 1944, a Nazi commander on the island of Crete was somehow mysteriously and miraculously kidnapped right under the nose of the Germans. No shots were fired, there was no bloodshed and no sign of a struggle. General Heinrich Kreipe simply vanished.

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8:47am

Thu April 16, 2015
Monkey See

Is There Anything Left To Say About 'Saturday Night Live'?

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:33 am

Live From New York
Edie Baskin Tribecca Film Festival

Why open a film festival whose reputation is for independent voices with a documentary salute to Saturday Night Live?

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7:29am

Thu April 16, 2015
Book Reviews

Lewis And Clark Battle Giant Spiders In 'Dead Lands'

Originally published on

Emily Jan NPR

I saw the title of Benjamin Percy's new book Dead Lands and I immediately thought, Oh, another zombie book. I read the synopsis — super-flu, nuclear bombs, a post-apocalyptic re-telling of the Lewis and Clark story — and I thought, yeah, but there's gotta be zombies in it, right?

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2:05pm

Wed April 15, 2015
Television

'Justified' Ends With An Unpredictable, Poetic And Memorable Finale

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:22 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. The TV series "Justified" ended its run on the FX cable network last night. Our TV critic, David Bianculli, couldn't wait to talk about it, so here he is.

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2:05pm

Wed April 15, 2015
Television

Billy Crystal And Josh Gad: Separated By A Generation But United By Laughs

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:58 pm

Billy Crystal (left) says that onstage Josh Gad (right) "lights up."
Ray Mickshaw FX

In the new FX series The Comedians, Billy Crystal and Josh Gad star as satirical versions of themselves. The show is about how the two comedians are hesitant to work together and share the spotlight, but they do, and they begin a strained relationship, in which they're separated from each other by a generational comedy gap.

But in real life, when Crystal and Gad met, they hit it off.

"Even though there's 30-something years between us, there's a lot of commonalities and a lot of interesting parallels in our careers," Crystal tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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10:03am

Wed April 15, 2015
Book Reviews

'All The Rage' Has All The Despair, And All The Confusion, Too

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:00 pm

All The Rage jacket
Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

The title of Courtney Summers' latest young adult novel, All The Rage, doesn't quite earn its seeming double meaning. It's a single entendre — "all the rage" really does just refer to anger, though the book could also have been called All the Confusion, All the Defiant Loneliness or All the Sublimated Self-Destruction.

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7:30am

Wed April 15, 2015
Book Reviews

'The Fishermen' Ventures Into Dark Waters

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 12:19 pm

Courtesy of the Hachette Book Group

"Omi-Ala was a dreadful river," explains Ben, the young narrator of Chigozie Obioma's The Fishermen. "Like many such rivers in Africa, Omi-Ala was once believed to be a god; people worshipped it." But everything changed when Europeans colonized and Christianized the part of Nigeria where the river lay. "[T]he people, now largely Christians, began to see it as an evil place. A cradle besmeared."

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3:33am

Wed April 15, 2015
Goats and Soda

From Horses To High-Rises: An Insider 'Unmasks' China's Economic Rise

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 8:11 am

As China continues its massive economic growth, especially in cities, the government continues to severely limit people's rights. Is that system sustainable?
Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

When Henry Paulson first visited Beijing in 1991 as a banker, cars still shared major roads with horses.

"I remember getting into a taxi that drove too fast on a two-lane highway ... [that was] clogged with bicycles and horses pulling carts," says the former secretary of treasury under George W. Bush. "You still saw the hutongs — the old neighborhoods [with narrow streets] — which were very, very colorful and an important part of life."

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