Arts

7:03am

Tue August 4, 2015
Book Reviews

Complex, Generational Music In Lyrical 'Daughters'

From childhood, The Daughters' Lulu has been a creature of music, able to discern the notes of her surroundings on whim and command: The B-minor of a knife striking a glass, the pitch of different car horns, the musical composition of a waiter's dropped tray. As an adult, she is an opera singer in high demand, a soprano of rare talent who "[prefers] to sing the songs of witches."

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5:01pm

Mon August 3, 2015
Fine Art

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 7:11 pm

Sultan 'Ali 'Adil Shah II Slays a Tiger (ca. 1660) is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's critically acclaimed Sultans of Deccan India, 1500-1700 Opulence and Fantasy exhibition.
The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

This is an introduction to NPR's Muslim Artists, Now series, which will highlight contemporary Muslim musicians, writers, painters and filmmakers, among others.

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2:49pm

Mon August 3, 2015
Author Interviews

Reflecting On Football And Addiction As 'Friday Night Lights' Turns 25

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 4:44 pm

Da Capo Press

Twenty-seven years ago, journalist Buzz Bissinger decided that he wanted to write about the big-time stakes of small-town high school football — he just needed to find the right town. At the suggestion of a college recruiter, he visited Odessa, a west Texas town with a high school football stadium capable of seating 19,000 — and a population of approximately 90,000.

"Odessa is just kind of a dusty, gritty place," Bissinger tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "And I see that stadium ... and it's like a rocket ship on the desert."

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7:03am

Mon August 3, 2015
Book Reviews

'Spies' Is A Cinematic Account Of Americans In War-Torn Paris

Originally published on Mon August 3, 2015 1:41 pm

BERLINER VERLAG/ARCHIV DPA /LANDOV

It's the least surprising thing in the world to discover that historian Alex Kershaw's latest book, Avenue of Spies, has already been optioned for development with Sony Pictures TV. Its circumstances — an American family in Paris aiding the French resistance from an apartment only a few doors down from the Paris headquarters of the SS — are too cinematic to ignore. And if that sounds like a coincidence so precarious only fiction can support it ... it sounded that way to the Jacksons, too.

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5:57pm

Sun August 2, 2015
Author Interviews

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:37 pm

Lydia Thompson NPR

Louis Sachar knows a few things about writing for kids. His first book, Sideways Stories From Wayside School, came out in 1978 — and the wacky collection is still in print.

His 1999 Newbery Medal winner, Holes, centers on a boy wrongly confined to a juvenile detention facility. It's mysterious and creepy, and it's still flying off the shelves.

So if he says kids will love a scary eco-bioterror-mystery-thriller-comedy, you just might trust him.

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5:09pm

Sun August 2, 2015
Politics

Jon Stewart's Private White House Meetings

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 6:37 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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5:09pm

Sun August 2, 2015
Movie Interviews

'Who Am I Without My Sport?' Greg Louganis On Life After Olympics

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:03 pm

The documentary Back On Board follows the career of four-time Olympic champion Greg Louganis.
HBO

Greg Louganis is the best diver of his generation — perhaps the best the world has ever seen. The four-time gold medalist is the only man to ever sweep the diving events in consecutive Olympics.

The new documentary Back on Board, by director Cheryl Furjanic and producer Will Sweeney, contrasts that success with the inner turmoil Louganis experienced rising to stardom at such a young age.

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7:27am

Sun August 2, 2015
Music Interviews

Colombia's La Momposina Sings A Tangled Social History

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The music of Colombia is in the spotlight this week as we check in with our friends at Alt Latino. Felix Contreras usually joins us with a number of artists to share. Today he has just one artist.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TAMBOLERO")

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7:27am

Sun August 2, 2015
Performing Arts

Caught In The Act: Joke-Stealing In The Age Of Twitter

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:03 pm

Conan O'Brien's been sued by a comedy writer who alleges he's been stealing jokes. But journalist Larry Getlen warns not to assume the worst: In the world of topical comedy, similar jokes are bound to arise.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Conan O'Brien got some bad news this past week: The late-night host is getting sued for allegedly stealing jokes. A freelance comedy writer claims that O'Brien lifted four jokes from the writer's personal blog and Twitter.

The dust-up arose after an odd story surfaced about a flight that had just two passengers on board. Naturally, the two men found some humor in it.

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7:27am

Sun August 2, 2015
Movie Interviews

'Best Of Enemies': When Televised Verbal Fireworks Were A Novelty

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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