New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Yah-New! Did Yahoo Hit The Mark With Its Logo Change?

Sep 5, 2013
Originally published on September 5, 2013 12:04 pm

Compare Yahoo's new logo, introduced Thursday, to what was there before.

According to CEO Marissa Mayer, "we knew we wanted a logo that reflected Yahoo — whimsical, yet sophisticated. Modern and fresh, with a nod to our history. Having a human touch, personal. Proud."

On her Tumblr page, Mayer goes on at length about how:

-- "We didn't want to have any straight lines in the logo. Straight lines don't exist in the human form and are extremely rare in nature, so the human touch in the logo is that all the lines and forms all have at least a slight curve.

-- "We preferred letters that had thicker and thinner strokes — conveying the subjective and editorial nature of some of what we do.

-- "Serifs were a big part of our old logo. It felt wrong to give them up altogether so we went for a sans serif font with 'scallops' on the ends of the letters.

-- "Our existing logo felt like the iconic Yahoo yodel. We wanted to preserve that and do something playful with the OO's.

-- "We wanted there to be a mathematical consistency to the logo, really pulling it together into one coherent mark."

The exclamation point also dances a bit on loading and reloading.

PCWorld thinks the logo is "a little bit sleeker" than its predecessor. Also, while "not a dramatic departure, it represents Yahoo's latest effort to add some shine to a brand that has lost its luster."

The new design came after "30 days of typographic teases," as the San Jose Mercury News notes, and set off the "expected opinion storm in social media. As is often the case, the haters moved the fastest."

We are not art experts by any stretch of the imagination. So we'll throw out a question to give the Two-Way crowd a chance to critique Yahoo's change.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.