Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Wyoming's GOP Caucuses: The Process Is Drawn Out And Confusing

Feb 28, 2012
Originally published on February 28, 2012 8:53 am

Republicans in Wyoming pick delegates for the national convention in a process that stretches from early February to mid-April. Besides being time-consuming, the process is also hard to understand.

In Wyoming, precinct caucuses are the first round of the political playoffs. Republicans from throughout the state meet in county caucuses to discuss issues, suggest platform ideas and decide whom to endorse.

"The caucus is great," says Khale Lenhart, vice chairman of the Laramie County Republicans, "because it allows people a chance to come out and debate on the local level among their neighbors, and gives people a chance to participate and actually be involved in a way that allows them to advocate and express their support."

Wyoming is a big, mostly rural state, where residents in the same county often travel long distances to get from place to place. So regular interaction on political issues isn't always a given.

The precinct caucuses also elect delegates to the county Republican convention.

Tammy Hooper, head of the state GOP party, says those conventions are spread through early March, and that's where about half of the state's counties pick delegates to support a candidate.

"There will be 12 delegates to the national convention and 12 alternates picked between March 6 through March 10," Hooper says.

The Wyoming GOP traditionally spreads the dates out to allow ranchers to attend during the height of the calving season. And even then it's not over, because in mid-April another 14 at-large presidential delegates will be selected during the statewide Republican convention. So it isn't known until April 14 which presidential candidate Wyoming Republicans favor.

But people in the state seem to care less about the actual outcome than they do about the chance to interact. And that's the case with first-time caucusgoer Barb Sandick.

"It will be interesting to see if our issues with what's going on in our state and in our nation are similar to the people who live next-door to me," Sendick says.

In this fast-paced, breaking-news world, Wyoming's process that takes more than two months seems old-fashioned. But longtime caucusgoer Kim Deti says while some might prefer the immediate results of a primary, she especially likes the slower caucuses.

"It's the building block of the whole process — you have to have a foundation for a system that's going to work, and this really is a purely democratic foundation," she says.

Deti notes that anyone can show up and eventually get to the national convention in Florida as one of Wyoming's 29 delegates. That, she says, is democracy.

Copyright 2013 Wyoming Public Radio Network. To see more, visit http://www.wyomingpublicmedia.org.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Wyoming, the way Republicans pick delegates for the National Republican Convention is so confusing, even people there can hardly understand it. The process stretches from early February to mid-April. Still, as Wyoming Public Radio's Bob Beck reports, those involved at the grassroots level would not have it any other way.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHATTER)

BOB BECK, BYLINE: It's 7:30 in the morning at Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne, and Greg Krall has some ideas of what he'd like to see the Republican nominee work on.

GREG KRALL: Well, I think the spending in this government's gone out of hand, and I want to be more fiscally conservative.

BECK: Are you set on somebody right now?

KRALL: No, I'm still kind of open. Whoever can beat Obama.

BECK: Spending is also a concern of caucus-goer Steve Johnson.

STEVE JOHNSON: The social issues I think they ought to leave off the table - because they're virtually irreconcilable - and focus on the real things that matter, and that's, at this point in time, are the economics, the budget.

BECK: In Wyoming, these precinct caucuses are the first round of the political playoffs. Republicans from throughout the state meet in county caucuses just like this to discuss issues and suggest platform ideas and, of course, figure out who they want to endorse. The vice chairman of the Laramie County Republicans, Khale Lenhart, loves the process.

KHALE LENHART: Yeah, the caucus is great because it allows people a chance to come out and debate on the local level amongst their neighbors and gives people a chance to participate and actually be involved in a way that allows them to advocate and, you know, express their support.

BECK: Wyoming is a big, mostly rural state, where residents in the same county often travel long distances. So regular interaction about these issues is not always a given. They will also elect delegates from these precinct caucuses to the county convention. State GOP Chair Tammy Hooper says those conventions are spread through early March. She says that's where about half of the state's counties pick delegates to support one candidate or another.

TAMMY HOOPER: So there will be 12 delegates to the national convention and 12 alternates picked between March 6th through March 10th.

BECK: The Wyoming GOP says they traditionally spread these dates out to allow ranchers to attend during the height of the calving season. Even then it's not over, because in mid-April, another 14-at-large presidential delegates will be selected during the statewide Republican convention. So you really won't know which presidential candidate Wyoming Republicans favor until April 14th.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Then we have a dilemma.

BECK: But people, it seems, care less about the actual outcome than they do about the chance to interact. That's the case with first-time caucus-goer Barb Sandick.

BARB SANDICK: I think it'll be interesting to see our issues with what's going on in our state and in our nation are similar to the people who live next door to me.

BECK: Certainly in this fast paced, breaking-news world, this process that takes over two months seems very old-fashioned. But long-time caucus-goer Kim Deti says while some might prefer the immediate results of a primary, she especially likes the slower caucuses.

KIM DETI: It's the building block of the whole process. You have to have a foundation for a system that's going to work, and this really is a purely democratic foundation.

BECK: Deti notes that anyone can show up and eventually get to the national convention in Florida as one of Wyoming's 29 delegates. That, she says, is democracy.

For NPR News, I'm Bob Beck in Cheyenne.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This is NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.