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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Women's Groups Outraged By Ruling On Morning-After Pill

Dec 8, 2011

Women's health advocates were quick to cry foul Wednesday when Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius overruled the opinion of the Food and Drug Administration that the popular "morning after" emergency contraceptive "Plan B One Step" should be allowed to be sold without a prescription — and without age restrictions.

"As doctors and researchers have repeatedly stated, ample research shows Plan B to be safe for women of all ages and appropriate for over-the-counter access. It is deeply disappointing that this administration would repeat the mistakes of the previous one," said Susan Wood, an associate professor at George Washington University's School of Public Health. Wood was an assistant commissioner for women's health at the FDA but quit in 2005 over its continued delay on over-the-counter approval for Plan B.

The result of Sebelius' action is that Plan B will remain available to women ages 17 and older without a prescription, but those 16 and younger will still need to see a doctor first in order to get the product.

That split approval means, in fact, that even older women will still face barriers to obtaining the contraceptive.

No matter how old you are, "having to go in, show your ID, talk to someone you've never met before and say 'I need Plan B' can be embarrassing," says Atsuko Koyama, a pediatrician and emergency room doctor at Boston Medical Center and a board member of the group Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health.

If the age restrictions are removed, Koyama said, "just going to the drug store and buying the Plan B along with your birthday cards and your other sundry items [would] help increase the access and decrease the number of unintended pregnancies."

In her letter rejecting the FDA's recommendation, Sebelius noted that if all age restrictions were removed, "the product would be available, without a prescription or other point-of-sale restrictions, even to the youngest girls of reproductive age" and questioned whether the company, Teva Pharmaceuticals, provided enough data to show those girls would have the ability to use the product correctly.

But Wood said that sets a double standard.

"They don't do this for pain medication, headache medication, cold medication," she said. "That's not part of how we assess products. Are we going to go and now do this with all products, or are contraceptives once again being singled out for this special treatment and this extra standard when we're talking about a very safe and very effective product that can really help women?"

Wood and others said Sebelius' action reminded them of how the Bush administration treated the issue.

"For me personally this is an incredibly disappointing moment," said Kirsten Moore, president of the Reproductive Health Care Technologies Project. "Because I was in the East Room of the White House in March 2009 when [President Obama] signed an executive order saying this administration was committed to restoring scientific integrity to the policymaking process. And that commitment just went up in smoke today."

But not everyone is unhappy with the decision.

"I think that most reasonable people will agree that a young girl who's sexually active — seeing a medical professional is a positive thing," said Jeanne Monahan of the conservative group the Family Research Council.

Lifting the age restrictions, she said, "we think is not in the best interest of young women's health."

Meanwhile, the Obama administration is facing yet another contraception-related decision: whether to back away from new rules requiring most religious employers to include contraception in their health insurance plans. Catholic leaders have already met personally with Obama to lobby for the change.

That, says Moore, coupled with this latest decision, is not a good sign. "When there's political pushback, they back down," she said of the administration.

A decision on the contraceptive rules is expected any day.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.