"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Why The Markets Shrugged Off French Vote

May 8, 2012
Originally published on May 8, 2012 7:41 am

The arguments for growth policies as opposed to austerity are taking center stage in Europe after the French and Greek elections.

His rhetoric aside, France's President-elect Francois Hollande is not rejecting austerity. In fact, he pledged to balance France's budget by the end of his five-year term, just one year later than his opponent, outgoing President Nicolas Sarkozy.

That's one reason the bond market's reaction to Hollande's victory was a yawn. Jacob Kirkegaard, a fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, says the market correctly perceived that the president-elect is not going to embark on some huge stimulus program in France.

Kirkegaard says that's likely to disappoint many of Hollande's supporters.

"He has led them to believe that he is going to usher in this new era of spending and the end of austerity through his rhetoric, but I think the reality is very, very different," Kirkegaard says.

Nevertheless, Kirkegaard says, Hollande will push Europe to add a growth component to its strategy, "which is something that in recent weeks Angela Merkel and other German leaders have been positive about."

Strategies For Solvency

The growth strategies being considered, however, don't involve boosting government spending at the member state level. Rather, they involve growth-friendly moves like reforming labor regulations, to make it easier for workers to cross borders and work anywhere in the EU.

Other strategies include expanding the European Investment Bank, and funding infrastructure projects with bonds backed jointly by all EU countries, but most importantly Germany.

"What I agree with is that Europe cannot solve its problems through austerity alone," says Mohamed El-Erian, CEO of the giant bond fund PIMCO. He's concerned about too little growth in Europe, but also about too much debt.

"What bond investors are looking at in order to put in more capital is a set of policies that addresses too little growth and too much debt," he says.

Bond investors apparently felt Hollande's victory was a move in that direction. Interest rates on France's 10-year bond fell to a seven-month low after the vote.

Reaction In Greece

There was greater market discomfort with the results of parliamentary elections in Greece. Moderates there lost ground to fringe parties on the right and left amid demands to renegotiate the Greek bailout package, with its tough austerity measures. The Greek stock market fell, and its banks were especially hard-hit.

Jacob Kirkegaard says the results in Greece raise the odds that it may leave the eurozone, but he says the country's fortunes are unlikely to affect the world in the same way they did last summer.

"This is really a fight between the taxpayers of Greece and the taxpayers in the rest of the euro area," he says. "This will be volatile, but I don't think it will have the huge contagious effect that we saw last year."

Kirkegaard says that's because under the most recent bailout package, the big losses on Greek debt were already distributed, and Europe's banks are in better shape now than they were last year.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.