Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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While Controversial, 'Kony 2012' Has Put Focus On Atrocities

Mar 8, 2012
Originally published on March 8, 2012 3:17 pm

The arguments continue over the merits of the viral video and Kony 2012 social media blitz that this week have exploded onto the Web.

But what can't be debated is that millions of Americans, many of them young people, now know about Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony and know a little bit more about the years of civil war in Northern Uganda.

As we reported Wednesday, the activist group Invisible Children's new 30-minute video has quickly become a large presence and sparked a huge conversation all over the Web — thanks to the group's savvy social media marketing campaign aimed at young people.

But as we also have reported, Invisible Children has been criticized for simplifying what's happening in Uganda, for focusing only on the killings, kidnappings and other atrocities carried out by Kony's Lord's Resistance Army and not those of other groups or government forces, and for the amount of money it spends on staff compensation rather than aid or other charitable activities.

Time magazine's Global Spin blog today rounds up most of the critiques in a post headlined "Why You Should Feel Awkward About the 'Kony 2012' Video." Among its points: "the LRA is no longer thought to be actually operating in northern Uganda. ... Its numbers at this point have diminished, perhaps amounting to 250 to 300 fighters at most. ... Kony, shadowy and illusive, is a faded warlord on the run, with no allies or foreign friends."

And as we've also noted, Invisible Children has now addressed its critics in a statement. It says, for example, that the group does not "defend any of the human rights abuses perpetrated by the Ugandan government or the Ugandan army (UPDF)." And it explains why some of Invisible Children's leaders once posed, holding guns, with members of the Sudan People's Liberation Army by saying "we thought it would be funny."

The arguments over Invisible Children's campaign will likely continue. But as we say, it has surely raised awareness about what's been happening in Uganda.

The Los Angeles Times notes that "the video quickly went viral; more than 32 million people had watched it on YouTube by Thursday morning. The phrase #stopkony is trending on Twitter as celebrities such as Rihanna and Zooey Deschanel urge their online followers to watch the video." And there's more to come, as the Times writes:

"The campaign argues that Kony must be made so famous that global pressure will stay on for the U.S. to continue its quest, helping governments in the region to track him down. It plans to paper cities with Kony posters on April 20, hoping to making the guerrilla leader a household name."

The Invisible Children video, which lasts about 30 minutes, follows. So does a 6-minute response from Ugandan blogger Rosebell Kagumire, who says the Kony 2012 video simplifies her nation's story too much and implies that Africans can't help themselves.

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