Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped vegetables and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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Weather The Storm With 6 Stories From NPR Books

Oct 29, 2012
Originally published on November 6, 2012 3:41 pm

As the East Coast hunkers down for the onslaught of Hurricane Sandy, NPR Books dug back into the archives to find stories about keeping safe — and sane — when disaster strikes. Here you'll find memoirs of past storms, novels about future storms and interviews with authors who've written about severe weather and climate change.


Powerless Cooking With 'The Storm Gourmet'
Think you're completely prepared for a hurricane? What about recipes? In her 2005 cookbook The Storm Gourmet: A Guide to Creating Extraordinary Meals Without Electricity, Daphne Nikolopoulos offers dishes to make when the power is out, working with ingredients that have a long shelf life. (All Things Considered interview, June 3, 2006)


Identifying Who Survives Disasters — And Why
Amanda Ripley's 2008 book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes — And Why, is the thinking person's manual for getting out alive. Ripley searches for patterns in human behavior by interviewing hundreds of people who lived through catastrophes. Quick-witted survivors are surprisingly anomalous. (Book Tour, July 22, 2008)


Climate 'Weirdness' Throws Ecosystems 'Out Of Kilter'
Science journalist Michael Lemonick doesn't want to be a doomsday prophet, but he does want to be realistic about the threat of climate change. "We've had time to act — and essentially we haven't acted," he says. Lemonick discusses his 2012 book, Global Weirdness: Severe Storms, Deadly Heat Waves, Relentless Drought, Rising Seas, and the Weather of the Future. (Fresh Air interview, Aug. 14, 2012)


Mississippi Meditation: A Poet Looks 'Beyond Katrina'
In her 2010 memoir, Beyond Katrina, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey revisits her own memories of the Gulf Coast region, and details how members of her family worked to rebuild their lives after the storm. She asks how the identity of the Gulf will be remembered — and how the region's stories will be told. (Fresh Air interview, Aug. 18, 2010)


As The Fragile Earth Slows, This 'Miracle' Becomes Calamity
The 2004 earthquake in Indonesia was so powerful, it sped up Earth's rotation by a fraction of a second each day. That detail inspired Karen Thompson Walker's debut 2012 novel called Age of Miracles, which imagines a world in which Earth has inexplicably begun to slow down, leading to a series of calamitous changes. (All Things Considered interview, June 25, 2012)


Chris Mooney Reads From 'Storm World'
In his 2007 book Storm World, Mooney tells the story of "a largely unsuspecting group of scientists" drawn into a national debate as fierce as any Category 4 storm. The question? Whether climate changes would affect hurricanes — and how. The author believes the increased strength and number of hyperstorms over the past decade are cause for concern and for action. (Book Tour, Sept. 26, 2007)


National Book Award Winner Tells Tale Of Katrina
In 2011, author Jesmyn Ward won the National Book Award for her novel, Salvage the Bones, which takes place in a small town during a hurricane. The story was based on her own experience of surviving Hurricane Katrina, which she describes in this essay. (All Things Considered commentary, Nov. 17, 2011)


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