"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Wearing Helmets In Tornadoes Gains Momentum

May 12, 2012
Originally published on May 12, 2012 1:18 pm

Months after safety advocates embraced wearing helmets during tornadoes — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidelines on the practice. The CDC says there's not yet enough scientific evidence to fully endorse the idea. But the agency is warming up to people donning helmets when severe weather threatens.

Since a horrific outbreak of tornadoes killed more than 250 people last year in Alabama, safety advocates have been on a crusade.

At a recent minor league baseball game in Birmingham, advocates handed out dozens of free bicycle helmets. But they weren't for play. They're to be used during tornadoes. Experts say several adults and children who wore helmets during last year's storms were saved because of them.

Event organizer Renee Crook says when people choose to live in weather-prone areas, they need to be ready. "Preparedness is what we're preaching. Preparedness. It's all about being prepared. Our motto or our slogan is, 'Don't be scared. Be prepared. Make a helmet part of your safety plan.' "

Up until this month, the idea of making a helmet part of a tornado safety plan was not something government health officials ever talked about publicly — although many people die in tornadoes from head injuries.

"What we're concerned about is that people might spend time looking for a helmet rather than seeking appropriate shelter and finding the safest place to be during a tornado," says Linda Degutis, director of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention.

After a report broadcast on NPR, the CDC is now talking about helmets and advising people on how to make them part of their safety plan. Even still, there's not enough research on the issue, Degutis says.

"Since we don't have the evidence that demonstrates whether helmets are effective or if they are effective, what kind of helmet would be effective ... people may not be protecting themselves as much as they might think they are," she says.

Some of the research is happening now in Alabama. One study is about to be published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. Doctors at the hospital Children's of Alabama say of the 60 patients they treated for storm-related injuries on April 27, 2011, two-thirds had head trauma. Mark Baker co-authored the study and says it's the first step to provide evidence to other medical experts about the benefits of wearing helmets.

"We'll start to see changes in family preparedness for severe storms and tornadoes over the course of several years," Baker says. "And the events over the last year I think have gone a long way toward increasing awareness and improving public safety."

Baker applauds the CDC for clarifying its position. He says it took years for people to start wearing seat belts and it may take time for helmets to catch on.

The CDC's Degutis cautions helmets don't provide total protection. "You know, there's a number of kinds of injuries that people can suffer in tornadoes from flying debris, from being thrown around, from being hit by something or thrown into something. So there certainly are other parts of the body that can be injured besides the head."

Still, for safety advocates like Renee Crook, wearing a helmet in severe weather just makes sense. She's continuing her campaign to hand out helmets across Alabama and raise awareness in hopes people can be safer the next time tornadoes threaten the state.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Months after safety advocates embraced wearing helmets during tornadoes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidelines on the practice. The CDC says there's not yet enough scientific evidence to fully endorse the idea.

But as NPR's Russell Lewis reports, the agency is warming up to people wearing helmets when severe weather threatens.

RUSSELL LEWIS, BYLINE: Since a horrific outbreak of tornadoes killed more than 250 people last year in Alabama, safety advocates have been on a crusade.

(SOUNDBITE OF A CROWD AT BASEBALL GAME)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Does that fit or do you think you need a bigger one?

LEWIS: At a recent minor league baseball game in Birmingham, advocates handed out dozens of free bicycle helmets, but they weren't for play. They're to be used during tornadoes. Experts say several adults and children who wore helmets during last year's storms were saved because of them. Event organizer Renee Crook says when people choose to live in weather-prone areas, they need to be ready.

RENEE CROOK: Preparedness is what we're preaching, preparedness. It's all about being prepared. Our motto or our slogan is: Don't be scared to be prepared. Make a helmet part of your safety plan.

LEWIS: Up until this month, the idea of making a helmet part of a tornado safety plan was not something government health officials ever talked about publicly, although many people die in tornadoes from head injuries.

DR. LINDA DEGUTIS: What we're concerned about is that many people might spend time looking for a helmet rather than seeking appropriate shelter and finding the safest place to be during a tornado.

LEWIS: That's Linda Degutis, director of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention. After a report broadcast on NPR, the CDC is now talking about helmets and advising people on how to make them part of their safety plan. Even still, there's not enough research on the issue, says Degutis.

DEGUTIS: Since we don't have the evidence that demonstrates whether helmets are effective or if they are effective, what kind of helmet would be effective, people may not be protecting themselves as much as they think they are.

LEWIS: Some of the research is happening now in Alabama. One study is about to be published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. Doctors at Children's Hospital of Alabama say of the 60 patients they treated for storm-related injuries on April 27th of last year, two-thirds had head trauma.

Mark Baker co-authored the study and says it's the first step to provide evidence to other medical experts about the benefits of wearing helmets.

DR. MARK BAKER: We'll start to see changes in family preparedness for severe storms and tornadoes over the course of several years. And the events over the last year I think have gone a long way towards increasing awareness and improving public safety.

LEWIS: Baker applauds the CDC for clarifying its position. He says it took years for people to start wearing seatbelts and it may take time for helmets to catch on. The CDC's Linda Degutis cautions helmets don't provide total protection.

DEGUTIS: You know, there's a number of kind of injuries that people can suffer in tornadoes; from flying debris, from being thrown around, from, you know, being hit by something or thrown into something. So there are certainly are other parts of the body that can be injured besides the head.

LEWIS: Still for safety advocates like Renee Crook, wearing a helmet in severe weather just makes sense. She's continuing her campaign to hand out helmets across Alabama and raise awareness in hopes people can be safer the next time tornadoes threaten the state.

Russell Lewis, NPR News, Birmingham. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.