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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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'We Do Not Tolerate Abuse,' Syracuse Chancellor Says As She Fires Coach

Nov 28, 2011
Originally published on November 28, 2011 8:53 am

The news from Syracuse University concerning child molestation allegations against assistant basketball coach Bernie Fine — which he denies — took several dramatic turns Sunday.

ESPN, on its Outside the Lines program, "reported that Fine's wife, Laurie, admitted in a tape-recorded 2002 telephone conversation that she had worries that her husband had sexually molested team ball boy Bobby Davis in their home, but said she felt powerless to stop the alleged abuse." Davis, now 39, and an older stepbrother have alleged that Fine molested them when they were ball boys with the team in the 1980s.

A third man came forward to claim that Fine had sexually abused him as a boy. As The Associated Press writes, "Zach Tomaselli, 23, of Lewiston, Maine, said Sunday that he told police that Fine molested him in 2002 in a Pittsburgh hotel room. The third accuser to come forward, Tomaselli said Fine touched him "multiple" times in that one incident." Tomaselli's father, however, told the AP he is certain his son never had any contact with Fine.

Then, last evening, Syracuse Chancellor Nancy Cantor announced that Fine was being fired after more than 35 seasons with the school (he had been on administrative leave since the story broke on Nov. 17). "Frankly, the events of the past week have shaken us all," she said in a statement posted on the school's website. "All of us have the responsibility, individually and collectively, to ensure that Syracuse University remains a safe place for every campus community member and everyone with whom we interact on a daily basis on campus or in the community as part of our learning, scholarship, or work. We do not tolerate abuse. If anything good comes out of this tragedy, it will be that this basic principle is reinforced."

Finally, Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim expressed regret, the AP says, for his initial expressions of support for Fine that might have been "insensitive to victims of abuse."

From Syracuse, The Post-Standard says that "attorneys for Fine, 65, denied in a statement Sunday afternoon that Fine sexually abused anyone. 'Mr. Fine remains hopeful of a credible and expeditious review of the relevant issues by law enforcement authorities,' it said."

The allegations about Fine follow, of course, the scandal at Penn State University — where former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky is accused of sexually abusing at least eight young boys for more than a decade. Sandusky says he's innocent. Head coach Joe Paterno and Penn State President Graham Spanier both lost their jobs after coming under criticism for allegedly not alerting authorities to reports about what Sandusky was accused of doing.

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