Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped vegetables and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Pages

Watching TV Online Often Exposes Slow Bandwidth

Oct 25, 2012
Originally published on October 25, 2012 11:20 am

There are more ways than ever to watch TV programs on the Internet, from Netflix and Amazon to Hulu. But many viewers discover that watching TV on the Web can be frustrating. Their favorite show might suddenly stop, stutter and be replaced by a note that reads "buffering." The problem is lack of bandwidth: The data that is the video just can't squeeze through the wires and onto the screen.

But there is a place where some people never worry about bandwidth. It's called Fiber Space, and it was created by Google as part of its Internet access project in Missouri.

"This is our demo space where people get a chance to experience Google Fiber," says Carlos Casas, who leads Google's team in Kansas City, Mo. The company is in the process of wiring the entire city with low-cost 1-gigabit broadband. That's about 100 times faster than what most Americans can get now.

"It's not yet installed in homes, and so we wanted to have a space where people could come and just see what the technology looks like," Casas says.

The Kansas City space connects all kinds of TVs, tablets and computers to Google's fast fiber network.

To duplicate an experience you might have at home, reporter Suzanne Hogan of Kansas City member station KCUR and I tried an experiment.

I used NPR's connection in Washington, D.C., to watch an HD nature video while downloading an 8-gigabyte video game that I wanted to play later. Hogan, joined by Casas and another Google team member, Tom Fitzgerald, did the same thing.

The video begins playing in Washington, but the game doesn't t start to download.

From Kansas City, Hogan reports, "The video is playing in the background. ... We haven't had any delay with that ... and we're currently how far along on the game?"

Fitzgerald answers, "33 percent downloaded."

In D.C., my 10-minute nature movie freezes. Meanwhile, back in Kansas City, Hogan tells me, "We've only got about two minutes left of this movie."

"I can start and play a whole other movie if you want," Fitzgerald offers.

Over the course of 10 minutes, Kansas City downloaded the 8-gigabyte game and watched two HD videos. In that same time, my video froze, and I downloaded 3.3 percent of the game. Fail.

Things are so much better in Kansas City because Google is streaming video and information directly through its high-capacity fiber network. Casas says the company hopes the Kansas City experiment will inspire broadband providers to deploy similar networks around the country.

"We saw it when we went from dial-up to broadband. People didn't think of the things we'd be able to do, and all of a sudden we have video conferencing, we have social media," he says. "So now we're very excited about the possibilities that fiber will bring."

Faster Internet speeds will not only make it possible to watch HD video while downloading a game. Blair Levin, a telecommunications specialist at the Aspen Institute, says he also imagines video chatting with friends while they're all watching the same game on TV.

"Wouldn't it be great if you could watch the college football game with all your buddies from college," he says, "and have something resembling the experience you had when you were in college, in terms of presence of each other."

Unfortunately, Levin says, there isn't much incentive right now for broadband providers like Comcast or Verizon to upgrade their networks. Cable can already provide faster broadband service than the telephone companies, and it would simply cost the telcos too much to catch up.

"In the middle of the last decade, the telcos were saying, 'We're going to provide better networks than cable,' " Levin says. "Now what they're simply saying is, 'We like the networks, we're not going to invest to be better networks — but we're going to try other ways in which we improve the value proposition.' "

Those values include things like bundling phone, Internet and TV to lure consumers away from cable. For their part, TV programmers are not all that interested in making it easier for fans to watch via the Internet.

"The programmers are making tens of billions of dollars by selling that programming in big bundles to cable distributors," says Susan Crawford, a former tech adviser to the Obama administration. "And they have no incentive to break up those bundles and make those individual channels available online. They'd make much, much less money."

For its part, Verizon did spend more than $20 billion building out its Fios fiber network to more than 17 million customers. But then it stopped. The company's Bob Elek says nobody seems to be using all that bandwidth.

"The market demand isn't really there," he says, "both from a consumer perspective and from the applications and the things that people are providing to be used on the network. It just isn't there yet."

A project like the one Google is setting up in Kansas City may open some eyes to what life could be like if we had faster networks. That might lead to more demand, and maybe an end to your buffering ... I mean, suffering.

Part of Morning Edition's weeklong series, How We Watch What We Watch.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There are more ways than ever to watch TV programs on the Internet: Netflix, Amazon, Hulu. But as many people are discovering, watching TV over the Web can be frustrating.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You might have been experiencing something like this: You're in the middle of watching your favorite show, and all of the sudden it stops and stu-stutters. It's doing something called buffering, and it happens because all the digital information that's in that TV show just can't squeeze through the wires into your home.

MONTAGNE: And that's because those wires are, in a way, not big enough. They don't have enough bandwidth to carry all that information. As part of our series How We Watch What We Watch, NPR's Laura Sydell looks at why we don't have more bandwidth.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: There is a place where some people can go and they'll never have to worry about bandwidth.

CARLOS CASAS: Welcome to the Fiber Space. This is our demo space, where people get a chance to experience Google Fiber.

SYDELL: Carlos Casas leads the team in Google's Kansas City, Missouri field office. The company's in the middle of a project to wire up the entire city with low-cost, one-gigabit broadband. That's about 100 times faster than what most Americans can get now.

CASAS: It's not yet installed in homes, and so we wanted to have a space where people could come and just see what the technology looks like, see things that are going to go into their home.

SYDELL: The Kansas City space connects all kinds of TVs, tablets and computers to Google's fast fiber network. I couldn't get to the space, so I asked Suzanne Hogan to pay a visit. She's a reporter with member station KCUR, and we tried an experiment to duplicate an experience you might have at home. I used NPR's connection in D.C. to watch an HD nature video...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SYDELL: ...while downloading an eight-gigabyte video game that I wanted to play later. Hogan, joined by Casas and another Google team member, Tom Fitzgerald, did the same thing.

SUZANNE HOGAN, BYLINE: Do you guys see the Mother Nature video on your screen?

SYDELL: We see the Mother Nature video. It is moving.

HOGAN: What scene are you on? What's not - is the game downloading?

SYDELL: The game is not downloading. We're watching the video, and the game has not started downloading. And you?

HOGAN: The video is playing in the background, and I'm seeing clouds and smoke - we haven't had any delay with that. And we are currently how far along on the game?

CASAS: The game is actually - we have 33 percent downloaded.

SYDELL: Then my 10-minute nature movie freezes. Meanwhile, back in Kansas City...

HOGAN: We've only got about two minutes left of this movie.

TOM FITZGERALD: I can start and play a whole other movie if you want.

HOGAN: Yeah, we might move ahead, Laura, and watch a different movie.

SYDELL: Thanks for leaving me behind. What do you think would be a good one to watch?

FITZGERALD: Let's see. Have we seen the virtual trip in Tahiti yet?

HOGAN: That's great.

SYDELL: I so hate you right now.

Over the course of 10 minutes, Kansas City downloaded the eight-gig game and watched two HD videos. Meanwhile, we're at 3.3 percent on the game.

HOGAN: We are 99 percent. It looks like it's...

FITZGERALD: Now, it's, again, just waiting on the install.

SYDELL: Things are so much better in Kansas City because Google is streaming video and information directly through its high-capacity fiber network. Google's Carlos Casas says the company hopes the Kansas City experiment will inspire broadband providers to deploy similar networks around the country.

CASAS: We saw it when we went from dial-up to broadband. People didn't think of the things they would be able to do, and all of a sudden, we have video conferencing. We have social media. So now we're very excited about the possibilities that fiber will bring. It will allow you to do the things you were doing anyway, but we're hoping that it'll open doors to many other things, as well.

SYDELL: Faster Internet speeds will not only make it possible to watch HD video while downloading a game. Blair Levin, a telecommunications specialist at the Aspen Institute, says he also imagines video chatting with friends while they're all watching the same game on TV.

BLAIR LEVIN: Wouldn't it be great if you could watch the college football game with all your buddies from college and have something resembling the experience you had when you were in college, in terms of presence of each other?

SYDELL: Unfortunately, Levin says, there isn't much incentive right now for broadband providers like Comcast or Verizon to upgrade their networks. Cable can already provide faster broadband service than the telephone companies, or telcos, and it would simply cost the telcos too much to catch up.

LEVIN: In the middle of the last decade, the telcos were saying we're going to provide better networks than cable. Now what they're simply saying is we like the networks we have. We're not going to invest to be better networks, but we're going to try other ways in which we improve the value proposition.

SYDELL: Like bundling phone, Internet and TV to lure consumers away from cable. For their part, TV programmers are not all that interested in making it easier for fans to watch over the Internet. Susan Crawford is a former tech adviser to the Obama administration.

SUSAN CRAWFORD: The programmers are making tens of billions of dollars by selling that programming in big bundles to cable distributors. And they have no incentive to break up those bundles and make those individual channels available online. They'd make much, much less money.

SYDELL: For its part, Verizon did spend more than $20 billion building out its FiOS fiber network to more than 17 million customers. But it stopped. The company's Bob Elek says nobody seems to be using all that bandwidth.

BOB ELEK: The market demand isn't really there, both from a consumer perspective and from the applications and the things that people are providing to be used on the network. It just isn't there yet.

SYDELL: But a project like the one Google is setting up in Kansas City may open some eyes to what life could be like if we had faster networks. That might lead to more demand, and maybe an end to your buffering - I mean, suffering. Laura Sydell, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.