Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin To Step Down

Jun 13, 2013

After four years on the job, the nation's top doctor is leaving. U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin announced late Wednesay that she plans to step down next month.

"Regina has served as America's doctor since 2009 and has impacted the health and lives of Americans across the country. I am deeply grateful for her leadership and service," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius wrote in an email to staff, according to CNN. "The Surgeon General's road to prevention has touched the lives of millions of Americans and has had a positive impact on the health of this Nation."

Benjamin, the 18th U.S. surgeon general, focused on preventive care, as she stated in this tweet:

CNN says she elaborated in a staff memo: "My goal was to create a grassroots movement, to change our health care system from one focused on sickness and disease to a system focused on wellness and prevention. With your help, that movement has begun."

Talking to WKRG-TV in Mobile, Ala., which is her hometown, Benjamin didn't list many future plans: "The thing I'm gonna do right now is take a couple of weeks and rest and enjoy the summer a little bit and come home for Fourth of July and then kind of look at whatever challenges are out there and really make a difference."

She does plan to return to the clinic she founded in Bayou La Batre, just south of Mobile, to work with some of her old patients. Benjamin was profiled in 1995 by the New York Times as an "Angel in a White Coat":

"When they cannot pay — which is often — she tells them to pay when they can, what little they can. With envelopes containing single $5 bills, they come by her office: whites, blacks, Vietnamese, Cambodians, Laotians, people who would be turned away by doctors who put proof of insurance ahead of healing.

"At a time when the nation's health care industry is becoming dominated by huge insurance companies, for-profit hospital corporations and massive health maintenance organizations, Dr. Benjamin, 38, is a throwback long thought to be extinct: a country doctor with a heart. She serves an isolated pocket of Alabama that is desperate for doctors, where only people who drag a living from the Gulf — and a few lost travelers — ever go."

There's some speculation Benjamin could consider running for national office. The Birmingham News says local Democrats have mused whether she might try for the U.S. House seat of retiring GOP Rep. Jo Bonner, but Benjamin so far hasn't commented publicly.

According to her official bio, Benjamin holds a medical degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, an MBA from Tulane University and 18 honorary degrees. She's served on numerous medical boards and commissions, and has been showered with accolades, including the MacArthur Genius Award Fellowship in 2008.

The deputy surgeon general, Rear Adm. Boris D. Lushniak, will step in as acting surgeon general during the search for Benjamin's replacement, according to Health and Human Services spokeswoman Dori Salcido.

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