Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Truth In Advertising: Pregnant Ladies Date On 'Pregnant And Dating'

May 31, 2013

There's a part of basic cable that you might call "soft reality" — the unscripted shows where everybody is nice, almost all the stories are happy, the comedy is mostly gentle, and the main characters are meant to be very sympathetic. Soft reality loves pregnancy and childbirth, as seen on shows like A Baby Story and some of the shows about giving birth to multiples. (Jon & Kate Plus 8 started as soft reality and wound up as something else entirely.)

Soft reality also loves romance, which is most emphatically demonstrated in wedding shows like Say Yes To The Dress. (Not so much wedding shows like Bridezillas — bridal television is bifurcated between brides-are-monsters and romance-is-wonderful.)

So it makes sense that soft reality would eventually take these two things and slap them together, as WE has done with the new show Pregnant & Dating.

It's unfortunate that none of the five profiled pregnant single women are into sweets, because the only thing that soft reality likes more than babies and weddings is cake, and a turducken-style effort called Pregnant, Dating & Baking would have shown even more panache than this.

The basic premise of Pregnant & Dating is that it's hard to date while you're pregnant, because believe it or not, there are men (these are all straight women, so their dating partners are guys) who think that getting involved with a pregnant woman — sometimes a woman a few weeks from giving birth — seems perhaps unnecessarily complicated. And this is treated like a sort of whimsically funny barrier to finding Mr. Right, kind of like the stuff the gals dealt with in Sex And The City.

Note that at least in the pilot, which airs Friday night, the complication is generally not that men will judge a woman for being unmarried and pregnant, as the show is assuming that all these men are pro-premarital sex when they're personally involved. It's really the pregnancy itself. As one of them puts it, he would hesitate with a pregnant woman because he would assume she had just gotten out of, in his words, "something." (He means a relationship. If you need to know more about this "something," National Geographic Channel sent out a press release Friday about a new show they have coming up called Sex: How It Works.)

But while it initially seems like this is going to be some sort of breezy, "you go girl" piece of television all about making it on your own, it quickly devolves into an oversharing, guilt-inducing carnival of awkwardness. Because quite honestly, when a man is out on a date with a woman and there are cameras there and she suddenly announces that she's pregnant, watching him try to keep a straight face and give her a nice, smooth-as-silk, "Ahhhh ... oh .... huh, reeeeeally " is a tiny bit funny. Not because of pregnancy, but because of television.

None of this is to say that dating a pregnant woman necessarily needs to be awkward, but springing it on guys in the middle of videotaped dates (whether that's authentically what's happening or not) is super awkward. And the woman who initially giggles and says that her pregnancy is the result of getting drunk on "Taco Tuesday" then feeling hurt that she doesn't feel very supported by the baby's father is even more awkward, no matter how pro-taco, pro-tequila, and pro-baby you might be. (Her story is actually quite sad when the show isn't making fun of it. That's only one of many tonal problems.)

There's certainly plenty of potential in documentary shows about single women deciding to have kids, and even in shows about how they pursue new relationships. They don't have to be dire; a show about being pregnant could be a good show. This is not that show. This is about what you'd expect from something called Pregnant & Dating.

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