Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

5 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

A Traditional Wedding Brings The Polish Highlands To Chicago

Oct 12, 2013
Originally published on October 12, 2013 8:05 am

Last weekend, a quiet block on the northwest side of Chicago appeared to be taken over by villagers from the mountains of southern Poland. That's because a Polish Highlander wedding was getting underway. But even before the couple arrived, there was a lot of pomp, circumstance — and moving of cars.

Any time now the bridal party will be arriving and Andy Zieba — father of the bride — is ringing doorbells, asking neighbors if they can please move their cars.

"Excuse me, ma'am? You don't know who's the Honda belong to?" he asks.

The anxious father needs to make room because five wooden carriages and 12 horses are headed to this block of modest frame bungalows. And one of the carriages is bringing the band.

Andy Zieba and his wife, Stella, are Górale — Highlanders who grew up in the southern, mountainous region of Poland. Some aspects of this wedding celebration will be traditional Polish, other aspects will be specific to Highlanders.

"I was born in a village," Andy Zieba says. "The name is Koniowka — a small village, not big village. Like 150 people."

When Zieba was a boy, food preparation could start days before a wedding.

"Kill the pig, you know, then make a sausage. Everything, everything. The cooking in the home. They don't have a banquet hall at that time," he says.

Life was tough back then and a wedding was a great occasion to kick back and enjoy life. The celebration could last for as long as three days, with hundreds of people coming from near and far.

About 500 guests will attend this two-day wedding.

The guests aren't all here yet, but two men with black hats and broad, colorful sashes draped across their chests have ridden their horses right up to the bottom step of the Ziebas' front porch.

These are the Pytace. In the old days, they'd ride from house to house, spreading the word that a marriage was about to take place. But today their role is more ceremonial. Meanwhile, the band is crammed into the kitchen, where they're singing in strictly Highlander dialect. And Stella Zieba, the mother of the bride, is a blur of motion, demanding that guests taste the Polish sandwiches.

This hustle and bustle is just a prelude for a tradition almost as significant as the marriage ceremony itself — the blessing from the parents.

"Well, they might tell them how much they love them and how much they're going to miss them, and wish them the best of luck — and just the best of everything," says Jessica Kulawiak, cousin to the bride. She's jockeying for position, as the big moment arrives.

As guests are asked to silence their phones, the couple, now in place, kneels before their parents, who each murmur a private blessing.

Then, a Highlander musician steps forward with his own prayer.

After the blessing, it's time for church. The bride loads into one carriage with her family, and the groom's entourage into another.

There are fewer than a dozen of these full-tilt Highlander weddings in Chicago each year. So, it's no wonder that neighbors like Elvis Delgado and Diane McMahon are gathered on their front lawns, cameras in hand.

"It's like we're all in the wedding," Delgado says.

"It's beautiful, it's magnificent," says McMahon. "And we've known these kids since they were little girls, so it's even better to see them grown up and getting married."

The carriages pull off, horses clopping, down the street.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A Polish Highlander wedding is a celebration of Old World tradition, music and family. It's an event that happens among villagers from the mountains of southern Poland. When one occurred earlier this fall on a quiet block, on the Northwest Side of Chicago, it met plenty of pomp and circumstance. Linda Paul reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRDS CHIRPING)

LINDA PAUL, BYLINE: Any time now the bridal party will be arriving and Mr. Zieba, father of the bride, is ringing doorbells, asking neighbors if they can please move their cars.

ANDY ZIEBA: Excuse me, ma'am? You know who's the Honda belong to?

PAUL: The anxious father needs to make room because five wooden carriages and 12 horses are headed to this block of modest frame bungalows. And one of the carriages is bringing the band.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

PAUL: Andy Zieba and his wife Stella are Gorale. They're Highlanders who grew up in the southern, mountainous region of Poland. Some aspects of this wedding celebration will be traditional Polish; other aspects will be specific to Highlanders.

ZIEBA: I born in a village. The name is Koniowka. Small village, not a big village - like 150 people.

PAUL: When Zieba was a boy, food prep could start days before a wedding..

ZIEBA: They kill the pig or, you know, they make sausage and everything, everything. Then cooking in the home. They don't have a banquet hall at that time.

PAUL: Life was tough back then and a wedding was a great occasion to kick back and enjoy life. The celebration could last for as long as three days with hundreds of people coming from near and far.

ZIEBA: Think we're going to have, like, almost 500 people.

PAUL: Today at your wedding?

ZIEBA: Today, yeah.

PAUL: And how long is the wedding going to be?

ZIEBA: Today and tomorrow. Two days for a wedding, yup.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Singing in foreign language)

PAUL: The guests aren't all here yet, but two men with black hats and broad colorful sashes draped across their chests have ridden their horses right up to the bottom step of the Zieba's front porch.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Singing in foreign language)

PAUL: These are the Pytace. In the old days they'd ride from house to house, spreading the word that a marriage was about to take place. But today their role is more ceremonial. Meanwhile, the band is crammed into the kitchen, where they're singing in strictly Highlander dialect. And Stella Zieba, the mother of the bride, is a blur of motion.

STELLA ZIEBA: Please? You have to just one. You have to take one Polish sandwich.

PAUL: Oh, OK.

ZIEBA: It's so delicious.

PAUL: This hustle and bustle is just prelude for a tradition almost as significant as the marriage ceremony itself - the blessing from the parents.

JESSICA KULAWIAK: Well, they might tell them how much they love them and how much they're going to miss them and wish them the best of luck, and, just the best of everything.

PAUL: That's Jessica Kulawiak, cousin to the bride. She's jockeying for position, as the big moment arrives.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Please be quiet for now.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: Everyone turn off the phone. Put it on vibrate.

PAUL: As guests are asked to silence their phones, the couple, now in place, kneels before their parents, who each murmur a private blessing.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Singing in foreign language)

PAUL: Then a Highlander musician steps forward with his own prayer.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (Singing in foreign language)

PAUL: After the blessing, it's time for church. The bride loads into one carriage with her family and the groom's entourage into another.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

PAUL: There are fewer than a dozen of these full-tilt Highlander weddings in the city of Chicago each year. So, it's no wonder that neighbors like Elvis Delgado and Diane McMahon are gathered on their front lawns, cameras in hand. It's like the whole neighborhood's out.

ELVIS DELGADO: Yes. It's like we're all in the wedding.

DIANE MCMAHON: It's beautiful. It's magnificent. And we've known these kids since they were little girls, so it's even better to see them grown up and getting married.

PAUL: For NPR News, this is Linda Paul.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.