"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Tornado Recovery Offers Joplin Students New Lessons

May 7, 2012
Originally published on May 7, 2012 6:34 am

Graduation is supposed to in part be about celebrating the future, but last year in Joplin, Mo., shortly after the high school graduation ceremony, an EF-5 tornado — the highest-strength rating — destroyed one-third of the city and killed 161 people, including one teen who had received his diploma that day.

In addition to the homes, hospital and businesses that were destroyed, the high school itself was in ruins, along with several other school buildings. Even though cash and equipment donations have poured in, students and teachers have contended with displacement, lingering pain and having to adapt to some unusual workarounds.

At the Northpark Mall in Joplin, one entrance stands out from the familiar Sears and Macy's storefronts. Instead of the name of a big department store above the doors, there are the words "Joplin High School." The facility, a former retail space the district renovated in a matter of weeks after the tornado, has come to be known as "the mall school."

Students and teachers there have learned what it means to adapt to change and be flexible.

"It was overwhelming in the beginning. The walls don't touch the ceiling, so you hear everything," says Katie Simpson, a senior at the so-called mall school, which is home to juniors and seniors here. The mall school has a modern design that students love, but there are problems.

"It's loud, it's noisy, and you can barely concentrate. But you get used to it after a while," she says.

Students aren't the only ones adjusting to a noisy environment. Virginia Gormely teaches her English class with soft music in the background as a choral group practices nearby, and she competes for her students' attention with a very loud teacher next door.

"We joke that we have dual-credit classes," Gormely says. "He teaches personal finance and there are many times when my kids actually answer the questions that he's asking his class. If they stumble, they'll answer."

Administrators have tried to give students a sense of normalcy. In spite of the troubles, Joplin High School Principal Kerry Sachetta says he hopes it's been a good year for students.

"We wanted one part of their day to be something that they could remember, especially our seniors," Sachetta says. "We wanted them to be able to say, 'You know what, I was in this club, I was in this organization, I was on this team, I was in this concert.' Not be able to look back and say, 'This tornado not only destroyed our town but it also wiped out everything I can remember about what was important to me growing up.' "

One of the buildings that did get wiped out was Irving Elementary. The students and teachers have been in another district facility this year with some classes being held nearby in trailers. Third-grade teacher Shelly Tarter says it's been a tough year, but she and the students have comforted each other.

"You know, they're always patting me on the back or giving me hugs and just saying, 'It's going to be OK.' I think they need to see how I'm responding to things and letting my emotions show," Tarter says. "I think that's a wonderful lesson for them."

The year has also provided some lessons not found in textbooks. Gormely says students have learned how to accept what has happened and move on.

"And I told them acceptance is a huge part of life," she says. "You're going to plan to be a doctor, and you may not be. It's all about acceptance and that's how you move on. And that's how every day is OK. Because you go, 'This didn't work out; this does.' "

Despite the sometimes emotional moments this year, the school district is looking to the future. In April, voters approved a $62 million bond issue to fund construction of four new schools and storm shelters. Later this month, this year's graduating class will reflect on the difficult year while listening to an unusually high-profile commencement speaker: President Obama.

Copyright 2014 KSMU-FM. To see more, visit http://ksmu.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Graduation is supposed to be about celebrating the future, but almost a year ago, in Joplin, Missouri, shortly after the graduation ceremony at the city's public high school, one of the most powerful tornados on record hit. A third of the city was destroyed; 161 people were killed, including a teen who had just received his diploma. The high school was among the buildings and businesses that were left in ruins that day.

Missy Shelton of member station KSMU looks at how the school's students have adapted and coped in the year that's passed.

MISSY SHELTON, BYLINE: I'm in the parking lot of North Park Mall in Joplin, Missouri. As I look around, I see familiar storefronts for Sears and Macy's. But one entrance looks quite different. Instead of the name of a big department store above the doors, there are the words Joplin High School. Inside this facility, which has come to be known as the mall school, students and teachers have learned exactly what it means to adapt to change and be flexible.

KATIE SIMPSON: It was overwhelming in the beginning. The walls don't touch the ceiling, so you hear everything.

SHELTON: That's Katie Simpson, a senior at the so-called mall school, which is home to juniors and seniors here. The mall school has a modern design that students love. But there are problems.

SIMPSON: It's loud, it's noisy, and you can barely concentrate. But you get used to it after a while.

SHELTON: Students aren't the only ones adjusting to a noisy environment. In a former retail space, the district renovated in a matter of weeks after the tornado, Virginia Gormely teaches her English class with soft music in the background as a choral group practices nearby, and she competes for her students' attention with a very loud teacher next door.

VIRGINIA GORMELY: We joke that we have dual-credit classes. He teaches personal finance and there are many times when my kids actually answer the questions.

SHELTON: In spite of the troubles, Joplin High School principal Kerry Sachetta says he hopes it's been a good year for students.

KERRY SACHETTA: We wanted one part of their day to be something that they could remember, especially our seniors. And we wanted them to be able to say, you know what, I was in this club, I was in this organization, I was on this team, I was in this concert. Not to be able to look back and say this tornado not only destroyed our town but it also wiped out everything I can remember about what was important to me growing up.

SHELTON: One of the buildings that did get wiped out was Irving Elementary. The students and teachers have been in another district facility this year with some classes being held nearby in trailers. Third-grade teacher Shelly Tarter says it's been a tough year, but she and the students have comforted each other.

SHELLY TARTER: You know, they're always patting me on the back or giving me hugs and just saying it's going to be OK. I think they need to see how I'm responding to things and letting my emotions show. I think that's a wonderful lesson for them.

SHELTON: The year has also provided some lessons not found in textbooks. English teacher Virginia Gormely says they've have learned how to accept what has happened and to move on.

GORMELY: And I told them acceptance is a huge part of life. I said you're going to plan to be a doctor and you may not be. It's all about acceptance and that's how you move on. And that's how every day is OK. Because you go, this didn't work out, this does.

SHELTON: Despite the sometimes emotional moments this year, the school district is looking to the future. In April, voters approved a $62 million bond issue to fund construction of four new schools and storm shelters. And later this month, this year's graduating class will reflect on the difficult year while listening to an unusually high-profile commencement speaker: President Obama.

For NPR News, I'm Missy Shelton. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.