Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

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The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Top Khmer Rouge Leaders Apologize For Regime's Atrocities

May 31, 2013
Originally published on May 31, 2013 2:47 pm

The top two surviving leaders of Cambodia's genocidal Khmer Rouge regime have expressed remorse for their actions while in power and acknowledged a degree of responsibility for the atrocities committed in their names.

Nuon Chea, the chief lieutenant of Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, who acted as head of state for the Maoist regime, are currently on trial for genocide and crimes against humanity.

They were responding to questions posed by the so-called civil parties, who are representing the victims' families at the United Nations-backed trial.

"As a leader, I must take responsibility for the damage, the danger to my nation," Nuon Chea said, offering "deepest condolences" to relatives of those who died.

"I feel remorseful for the crimes that were committed intentionally or unintentionally, whether or not I had known about it or not known about it," he said.

Khieu Samphan told Yim Roum Doul, whose father died during Khmer Rouge rule, that he didn't know at the time of "the atrocities committed by the military commanders and leaders."

"I feel extremely sorry for the disappearance and extremely brutal killing of your father," he said.

"I did not know the great suffering of our people," he said, adding that the perpetrators "must be brought to justice."

Pol Pot was able to exploit instability created by the Vietnam War to overthrow a weak U.S.-backed government in Cambodia in 1975. Inspired by the forced collectivization policies of Chinese leader Mao Tse Tung, Pol Pot then embarked on a bloody restructuring of society aimed at his vision of a utopian, agrarian state. As many as two million people were executed or died of disease, starvation or overwork in the regime's "Killing Fields".

In 1979, Vietnam invaded Cambodia and pushed Pol Pot and his remaining followers into the jungle, where they fought an unsuccessful insurgency for the next two decades. Pol Pot died in 1998 under suspicious circumstances.

In the past, both Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan have maintained that they believed at the time they were acting in the best interests of the Cambodian people and that they were unaware of the full extent of the killings.

So far, only Kaing Guek Eav — better known as Duch — who headed the regime's notorious S-21 prison, has been held accountable. Last year, he appealed to the country's U.N.-backed war crimes court to reduce his 19-year-sentence. Instead, the court increased the 69-year-old's sentence to life.

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