The new British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her cabinet today.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Texas Abortion Fight Is Just One Of Many This Year

Jul 12, 2013

The eyes of the nation may be on Texas, as legislators fight over whether to impose strict new regulations on abortion and those who provide it. But a report on abortion laws and regulation across the country finds that the Lone Star State isn't alone.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, during the first half of 2013, more than a dozen states enacted 45 separate provisions restricting access to abortion. That was well down from the record-breaking 80 restrictions enacted in 2011, but it's still the second-highest the group ever recorded. The Center for Reproductive Rights counts 15 states that have passed restrictive laws this year.

Arkansas and North Dakota each passed two separate bans on abortion, both earlier and later in pregnancy. (The previous 12-week ban in Arkansas has already been blocked by a federal court; and a six-week ban has been challenged in North Dakota.) If, as expected, the Texas law is passed in the coming days, that would make five bans passed in three states in 2013.

Meanwhile, at least six states — Alabama, North Dakota, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin and Virginia — imposed stricter regulations on abortion clinics.

Abortion-rights backers charge many of those regulations, which include requiring doctors to have hospital-admitting privileges, aren't necessary to ensure the safety of patients and are intended, instead, to force the abortion clinics out of business. North Carolina, like Texas, is still in the midst of a high-stakes debate over the issue.

And four more states — Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana and Mississippi — prohibited the use of telemedicine to prescribe the abortion pill RU-486. That brings to 12 the number of states that now require a physician to be in the same room with a patient in order to prescribe the drug that can terminate a pregnancy.

Kansas and Montana went a step further in trying to deter women from having abortions. Both states passed legislation that would shield health care providers from malpractice suits if they withhold information about a woman's pregnancy because they are concerned it might lead her to consider having the procedure.

While many legislatures are now adjourned or wrapping up sessions for the year, abortion opponents are still hoping that the outrage generated by the May murder conviction of abortion provider Dr. Kermit Gosnell will help generate more legislation for their cause.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.