The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The middle of summer is when the surprises in publishing turn up. I'm talking about those quietly commanding books that publishers tend to put out now, because fall and winter are focused on big books by established authors. Which brings us to The Dream Life of Astronauts, by Patrick Ryan, a very funny and touching collection of nine short stories that take place in the 1960s and '70s around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

At least that's one premise of the Allen Brain Observatory, which launched Wednesday and lets anyone with an Internet connection study a mouse brain as it responds to visual information.

The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Pages

Te'o Drama Is Telling In More Ways Than One

Jan 24, 2013
Originally published on January 24, 2013 4:28 pm

Finally, I have a word about Manti Te'o, the star Notre Dame linebacker, Heisman trophy runner up, who says he was the victim of an ugly hoax where someone — probably a male friend of his — created an online identity of a young women, with whom Te'o says he fell in love, although he never met her.

Can I just ask you? Is it okay that I can't work up a lot of outrage about this? Yes, lying is bad. Te'o — who just had an interview with talk show host Katie Couric — admits he did lie, at least briefly, because he repeated the story in an interview at least once after he knew it wasn't true.

Overall, though, he insists he was the victim, not the perpetrator of a hoax. His family and Notre Dame officials agree, especially after the university hired investigators to check the story out .

If it's all the same to you, though, I'd like to save my outrage for a different story on that campus. What happened to a real girl who died, not a fake one: Lizzy Seeberg. This is a good place to mention that what I have to say next isn't for everybody's ears.

According to Washington Post columnist Melinda Henneberger — herself a Notre Dame alumna — who has reported on this extensively, Seeberg was 19 years old, a freshman at St. Mary's College, which is nearby Notre Dame.

Two years ago, she took her own life, after she reported to campus police that a Notre Dame football player sexually assaulted her, and nothing happened. Well, not nothing, according to Henneberger.

After Lizzy Seeberg went to campus police, a friend of the player in question sent her a series of texts telling her that "Messing with Notre Dame football is a bad idea" and "Don't Do Anything You'd Regret." But investigators didn't even interview the accused until 15 days after the report and five days after she'd died.

Henneberger writes about another incident where a girl claimed she'd been assaulted by a player and received text messages telling her to keep her mouth shut. In neither case has there been a disciplinary or criminal sanction.

I will leave it to others to decide whether Notre Dame's official attitude toward sexual assault — at least where football players are concerned — takes its cue from the Taliban, where anything that happens to a woman is somehow her fault.

But I want to save some outrage for the rest of us: the adults out here who have really left our young people impossibly muddled messages about sexuality. This is not to excuse violence or even irresponsible behavior by any means. But it is to say that our messages, as a culture, to young people are utterly incoherent.

The traditionalist message about sex, "No. Stop. Don't. Quick! Get married! To someone of the opposite sex!" — absolutely ignores the reality that there is, for most people these days, a very long ramp to adulthood.

That marriage at 19, or 20, or 22 isn't the norm. That different people love differently, and it can take time to figure that out. And that there is a deep desire for both physical and emotional intimacy during that long ramp to adulthood that "No. Stop. Don't." does not address.

In Te'o's case, is it really hard to understand why a young man, being held to certain expectations, might satisfy that desire with an online relationship with a girl he never met?

But the hyper-liberal message about sex, "Whatever, It's All Good." doesn't do it either. "Whatever" doesn't describe or explain the deep power of sex, or the reality that not everything that feels good is good for you.

Don't get me started on a culture that tells girls to own their inner vixen while still punishing the victim when it all goes wrong. Don't get me started on a culture that claims everybody's equal but still tells boys — like sportscaster Brent Musburger did recently — that their reward for being successful at something, say football, is that they get the girl, as if she's a gift-wrapped present.

So, yes, lying is bad. But let's be mad at ourselves, because we are lying to young people everyday by refusing to tell them what we know is true. Sex is big, powerful, and complicated. And the time and place to find that out should not be in a locker room, at a kegger, on the Internet, or god forbid, at the police station.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally, I have a word about Manti Te'o, the star Notre Dame linebacker, Heisman Trophy runner-up, who says he was the victim of an ugly hoax, where someone, probably a male friend of his, created an online identity of a young woman with whom Te'o says he fell in love, although he never met her.

Can I just ask you? Is it OK that I can't work up a lot of outrage about this? Yes, lying is bad. And Te'o, who just had an interview with talk show host Katie Couric, admits he did lie - at least briefly - because he repeated the story in an interview at least once after he knew it wasn't true. Overall though, he insists he was the victim, not the perpetrator, of the hoax, and his family and Notre Dame officials agree - especially after the university hired investigators to check the story out.

If it's all the same to you, though, I'd like to save my outrage for a different story on that campus - what happened to real girl who died, not a fake one. Her name was Lizzy Seeberg. And this is probably a good place to mention that what I have to say next isn't for everybody's ears.

According to Washington Post columnist Melinda Henneberger, herself a Notre Dame alumna, who has reported on this extensively, Seeberg was 19 years old, a freshman at St. Mary's College, which is nearby Notre Dame. Two years ago, she took her own life after she reported to campus police that a Notre Dame football player sexually assaulted her and nothing happened. Well, not nothing, according to Henneberger.

After Lizzy Seeberg went to campus police, a friend of the player in question sent her a series of texts telling her that quote, "messing with Notre Dame football is a bad idea." And quote, "don't do anything you'd regret."

But the investigators didn't even interview the accused until 15 days after the report and five days after she died. And Henneberger writes about another incident where a girl claimed she'd been assaulted by a player and received text messages telling her to keep her mouth shut. In neither case has there been a disciplinary or criminal sanction.

I will leave it to others to decide whether Notre Dame's official attitude toward sexual assault - at least for football players are concerned - takes its cue from the Taliban where anything that happens to a woman is somehow her fault. But I want to save some outrage for the rest of us, the adults out here who have really left our young people impossibly muddled messages about sexuality. And this is not to excuse violence or even irresponsible behavior by any means, but it is to say that our messages as a culture, to young people, are utterly incoherent.

The traditionalist message about sex: No. Stop. Don't. Quick. Get married, to someone of the opposite sex absolutely ignores the reality that it is for most people these days a very long ramp to adulthood, that marriage at 19 or 20 or 22 isn't the norm; that different people love differently and it can take some time to figure that out. And that there is a deep desire for both physical and emotional intimacy during that long ramp to adulthood that no, stop, don't, does not address.

In Te'o's case, is it really hard to understand why young man being held to certain expectations might satisfy that desire with an online relationship with a girl he never met? But the hyper liberal message about sex whatever, it's all good, doesn't do it either. Whatever, doesn't describe or explain the deep power of sex or the reality that not everything that feels good is good for you.

And don't get me started on a culture that tells girls to own their inner vixen, while still punishing the victim when it all goes wrong. And don't get me started on a culture that claims everybody's equal, but still tells boys, like sportscaster Brent Musburger did recently, that their reward for being successful at something, say football, is that they get the girl, as if she's a gift wrapped present.

So, yes, lying is bad. But let's be mad at ourselves because we are lying to young people every day by refusing to tell them what we know is true: sex is big, powerful and complicated and the time and place to find that out should not be in the locker room, at a kegger, on the Internet or, god for bid, at the police station.

And that's our program for today. I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's talk more tomorrow.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.