Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

5 hours ago
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Tech Week: U.S. Spying, Health Site Blame Game And New iPads

Oct 25, 2013
Originally published on October 25, 2013 2:02 pm

"Too big to succeed."

That's how one of my sources described the complex, complicated HealthCare.gov tech system that was built with 55 contractors in several discrete parts, all without a clear system integrator. The issues and recrimination in Congress over the rollout dominated our week, on air and online. On Monday the administration announced a "tech surge" to fix the system, but would adding more manpower help or hurt? By week's end, a congressional panel called four of the system's major contractors in to testify, where they blamed the federal government for not better "quarterbacking" the project.

The problems of HealthCare.gov present an opportunity, says the U.K. Executive Director of Digital Mike Bracken. He says it's about time for the U.S. to address the systemic forces that led to this mess — American leaders who think of tech projects as "bridges to be bought" rather than services, and a burdensome procurement process that feeds into that thinking. Read his full Q&A for more.

Also on All Tech this week, Pew came out with some new numbers on how we feel about online dating, Emily Siner looked into the history of the word "glitch," and we chose a huggable lampshade as our Weekly Innovation. And our sister blogs at NPR covered Twitter setting its IPO price, why a PlayStation costs nearly $2,000 in Brazil and how NASA has its broadband connection up and running in space.

The Big Conversation

This week's revelations from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden's leaks centered on how the U.S. spied on its allies. Reports say the NSA tapped into former Mexican President Felipe Calderon's email, French phone and Internet traffic, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone as well as the phone calls of 35 world leaders.

Also, you probably heard that Apple released its new line of iPads, in which, as The New Yorker describes, Apple made more progress in its war on the pixel. We didn't cover it, because we are resisting putting time and resources into product announcements that the tech trade press covers so thoroughly. In fact, Dave Winer chastised the tech press for the way it covers Apple, writing, "At some point everyone is going to realize this. They're going to look down at next year's iPad or iPhone or whatever, and realize that it's just a small improvement over last year's."

Other Curiosities

Nieman Journalism Lab: We're spending more and more time online. So what are we doing less of?

A look at what online media seems to be replacing in our daily lives.

The Verge: Breast intentions? New study spurs debate over online breast milk sales

A new study shows the breast-milk-sharing economy is transferring a lot of bacteria-laden liquid that's unsafe for babies.

The Week: Oops: Police bust marijuana farmer using Google Earth

Time was, you could grow your marijuana out of the prying satellite view of police. Times have changed.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.