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NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

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Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

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How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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Taxes Are Certain, But What About Romney's Cuts?

Oct 7, 2012
Originally published on October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Republican Mitt Romney started his campaign calling for big tax cuts, but now he has changed course. He's warning middle-class families not to raise their hopes too high.

Romney couldn't have been more emphatic than he was last November at a candidates' debate in Michigan.

"What I want to do is help the people who've been hurt the most, and that's the middle class," he said. "And so what I do is focus a substantial tax break on middle-income Americans."

He put a middle-class tax cut at the top of his priority list: a 20 percent reduction in tax rates across the board.

"Right now, let's get the job done first that has to be done immediately. Let's lower the tax rates on middle-income Americans," he said.

Then, at a debate in Tampa this January, Romney got a little more specific.

"The real question people are gonna ask is, who's going to help the American people at a time when folks are having real tough times? And that's why I've put forward a plan to eliminate the tax on savings for middle-income Americans," he said. "Anyone making under $200,000 a year, I would eliminate the tax on interest, dividends and capital gains."

Shaking Up Tax Plans

But then came Romney's victory in the primaries, and a new set of goals to meet.

"Well, I think you hit a reset button for the fall campaign. Everything changes," campaign adviser Eric Fehrnstrom said on CNN. "It's almost like an Etch A Sketch. You can kind of shake it up, and we start all over again."

Romney shook up his plans on the tax cuts. He still wanted to lower the tax rates, but now he was more emphatic about the need for tax changes to be revenue-neutral.

In September, he had words of caution for the crowd that filled the gym at a suburban Ohio high school.

"By the way, don't be expecting a huge cut in taxes, because I'm also going to lower deductions and exemptions," he said.

In other words, your tax rate might be lower, but your taxable income might be higher. He elaborated in the Wednesday night debate with President Obama.

"I will not, under any circumstances, raise taxes on middle-income families. I will lower taxes on middle-income families," he said.

But he avoided details. He said he would work with Congress, and he quickly moved to talk about another goal: lowering the tax rate for small-business people.

"If we lower that rate, they will be able to hire more people. For me, this is about jobs," he said.

Will The Tax Cut Stick?

As the campaign goes on, Romney gives the tax cuts more and more to do: Help the middle class, produce more jobs, keep the same amount of money flowing into the government, and more.

At the conservative think tank American Enterprise Institute, research fellow Michael Strain says Romney has plenty of tax variables he can adjust.

"There are a lot of different levers to pull here. You have the marginal tax rates, you have the amount of income that's subject to taxation, you have the amount of income that you can deduct from your gross income to calculate your taxable income," Strain says.

Is a middle-class tax cut possible with everything else? Strain thinks it is.

"In order to do that, you would have to have a specific plan. And we haven't seen that from Gov. Romney yet," he says.

But at the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, co-director William Gale says Romney is caught in a bind.

"He has made a set of proposals that are jointly impossible to fulfill. And so something has to give," he says.

It may be that what's giving — as Romney told the crowd in Ohio — is the middle-class tax cut.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The threat of automatic budget cuts, which Senator Simpson mentioned, may explain the evolution of Mitt Romney's tax plan. The Republican presidential candidate started his campaign calling for big tax cuts. Now, Romney is stepping that back. NPR's Peter Overby reports.

PETER OVERBY, BYLINE: Mitt Romney couldn't have been more emphatic than he was last November at a candidates' debate in Michigan.

MITT ROMNEY: What I want to do is help the people who've been hurt the most, and that's the middle class. And so what I do is focus a substantial tax break on middle-income Americans.

OVERBY: He put a middle-class tax cut at the top of his priority list - a 20 percent reduction in tax rates across the board.

ROMNEY: Right now, let's get the job done first that has to be done immediately. Let's lower the tax rates on middle-income Americans.

OVERBY: Then at a debate in Tampa this January, Romney got a little more specific.

ROMNEY: The real question people are going to ask is who's going to help the American people at a time when folks are having real tough times? And that's why I've put forward a plan to eliminate the tax on savings for middle-income Americans. Anyone making under $200,000 a year I would eliminate the interest on interest, dividends and capital gains.

OVERBY: But then came Romney's victory in the primaries and a new set of goals to meet. Campaign adviser Eric Fehrnstrom put it this way on CNN.

ERIC FEHRNSTROM: Well, I think he hit a reset button for the fall campaign. Everything changes. It's almost like an Etch-a-Sketch. You can kind of shake it up and we start all over again.

OVERBY: Romney shook up his plans on the tax cuts. He still wanted to lower the tax rates, but now he was emphasizing that the tax changes to be revenue neutral. Last month, he had words of caution for the crowd that filled the gym at a suburban Ohio high school.

ROMNEY: By the way, don't be expecting a huge cut in taxes because I'm also going to lower deductions and exemptions.

OVERBY: In other words, your tax rate might be lower but your taxable income might be higher. He elaborated in the Wednesday night debate with President Obama.

ROMNEY: I will not, under any circumstances, raise taxes on middle-income families. I will lower taxes on middle-income families.

OVERBY: But he avoided details. He said he would work with Congress. And he quickly moved to talk about another goal - lowering the tax rate for small businesspeople.

ROMNEY: And if we lower that rate, they will be able to hire more people. For me, this is about jobs.

OVERBY: So, as the campaign goes on, Romney gives the tax cuts more and more to do - help the middle class, produce more jobs, keep the same amount of money flowing into the government, and other goals as well. At the conservative think tank, American Enterprise Institute, research fellow Michael Strain says Romney has plenty of tax variables he can adjust.

MICHAEL STRAIN: There are a lot of different levers to pull here. You have the marginal tax rates, you have the amount of income that's subject to taxation, you have the amount of income that you can deduct from your gross income to calculate your taxable income.

OVERBY: Is a middle class tax cut possible with everything else? Strain thinks it is.

STRAIN: In order to do that, you would have to have a specific plan. And we haven't seen that from Governor Romney yet.

OVERBY: But at the non-partisan Tax Policy Center co-director William Gale says Romney is caught in a bind.

WILLIAM GALE: He has made a set of proposals that are jointly impossible to fulfill. And so something has to give.

OVERBY: And it may be that what's giving, as Romney told the crowd in Ohio, is that middle-class tax cut. Peter Overby, NPR News, Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: And you're listening to NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.