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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

21 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Talk Of Zombies Aside, Gun Bills Face Political Reality

Mar 16, 2013
Originally published on March 16, 2013 1:52 pm

Two more gun control bills are heading to the Senate floor after narrowly winning approval from the Senate Judiciary Committee this week. The legislation requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales will likely face stiff opposition in its current version, but it's the second proposal, banning assault weapons, that may get particularly heated push back from lawmakers.

Maybe if zombies attacked, you might need a semiautomatic assault weapon for self-defense. That was one concession Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., was willing to make this week when the Senate Judiciary Committee was debating the assault weapons ban. But short of an entire zombie takeover, Leahy says, he's always been perfectly satisfied with his .45-caliber at home.

"Even when we had people escaping from prison announcing they were going to kill me, I felt pretty comfortable with that," he said.

Of course, what's a legislative debate without a few extreme examples? Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, joined in when he said that taking assault weapons away from law-abiding citizens would leave them outgunned by criminals.

"We're going to give the American citizen a pea shooter to defend themselves with," he argued.

Pea shooters and zombies depict a scenario that seems almost a planet away from the murders in Newtown, Conn., that launched these legislative efforts. Democrats in favor of the assault weapons ban, like Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, aren't deluding themselves about the political realities.

"Realistically, the assault weapons ban faces a very steep uphill climb," he said this week. "But nothing is impossible after Newtown, which so powerfully changed things. We are all different after Newtown."

Still, the National Rifle Association has made clear that it will oppose any assault weapons ban. So Blumenthal and his allies say they have greater hopes for a separate provision within the bill — one that bans high-capacity ammunition magazines.

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