Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Tai Chi May Help Parkinson's Patients Regain Balance

Feb 9, 2012
Originally published on February 9, 2012 8:35 pm

Tai chi, the Chinese martial art involving slow and rhythmic movement, has been shown to benefit older people by maintaining balance and strength. Now, researchers have found that tai chi also helps patients who suffer from Parkinson's disease.

Leona Maricle was diagnosed with Parkinson's two years ago. At the time, she was teaching math, and she says she had experienced the telltale tremors of Parkinson's for a number of years. She learned how to cope.

"The students began to notice that my hands were trembling," she recalls, "so I started learning how to compensate by keeping that hand under the table and using the other hand to pass out papers, interact with students and hand out pencils."

But soon it became clear that Maricle just couldn't give teaching her "best" anymore. She retired at age 67.

Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system, affects movement and motor control. "I would need to think two or three times about moving a particular part of my body," says Maricle. "When I was sitting in a chair and needed to get up, it would take two or three mental messages to my muscles to actually move my body."

Maricle had difficulty walking upstairs, downstairs, to the car or down the street. So it's no wonder that, when she heard about a new study at the nearby Oregon Research Institute to look at the potential benefits of tai chi for Parkinson's patients, she jumped at the chance. Hoping for help but also loving all things Chinese, Maricle saw the study as a perfect fit for her.

The study, which appears in the current New England Journal of Medicine, was headed by research scientist Fuzhong Li, who practices tai chi himself. Tai chi is sometimes described as "meditation in motion," because it promotes serenity through gentle movements, connecting the mind to the body. It has been shown to help with loss of balance during normal aging and can help relieve stress. Typically, the positions and postures of tai chi involve slow, focused movements that flow from one to the next.

In the study, Li divided Parkinson's patients into three groups. One group did resistance training with weights. Another, stretching classes. And the third took up tai chi. Each group participated in a 60-minute class twice a week for six months.

When they finished, Li found that the tai chi patients were stronger and had much better balance than patients in the other two groups. In fact, Li says their balance was "four times better than those patients assigned to the stretching group and about two times better than those in the resistance-training group."

That led to significantly fewer falls for patients in the tai chi group. Maricle says that before tai chi, she would lose her balance eight to 10 times a day. Now it hardly ever happens. She recently even saved herself from what would have been a sure fall before tai chi. It was raining and dark, and she tripped on the curb as she got out of her car. She was able to hop onto the curb and steady herself.

"That would have been a fall for sure six or eight months ago," she says.

Researchers don't know exactly how tai chi works to restore balance. UCLA psychiatrist and brain scientist Michael Irwin says it may work by literally re-training areas of the brain that control movement.

"There's a memory component of our nerves, and they're receiving signals from our body all the time that are integrated by the brain," Irwin says. "And it may be that what happens with tai chi is that it's bringing awareness of the brain to these areas of the body" — thereby strengthening those areas of the brain.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's end this hour with some thoughts on moving our bodies. We'll add some more music to our Ultimate Workout Mix in a few moments.

Now for some Tai Chi, the Chinese martial art involving slow and rhythmic movement. It benefits older people by maintaining balance and strength.

And as NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, researchers have found Tai Chi also helps people who suffer from Parkinson's disease.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: For Leona Maricle, the first sign that she had a problem was the shaking. She was a math teacher.

LEONA MARICLE: The students began to notice that my hands were trembling. And so I started learning how to compensate by keeping that affected hand under the table and use my other hand - my non-dominant hand - to pass out papers and to interact with the students.

NEIGHMOND: Pretty soon it became clear that Maricle couldn't give her best, so she retired at 67. That was two years ago, about the same time she was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system.

MARICLE: I would need to think two or three times about moving a particular part of my body. When I was sitting in a chair and wanted to get up, it took me two or three mental messages to go to my muscles to actually move my body.

NEIGHMOND: Soon, Maricle had difficulty walking upstairs, downstairs, to the car, or just down the street. So when she heard the Oregon Research Institute was starting a study of Tai Chi - to see if it helped Parkinson's patients - she signed up right away. The study was headed by research scientist Fuzhong Li.

DR. FUZHONG LI: We push. We lean bodies forward, almost leaning towards our limits before you feel you need to take a step. And then...

NEIGHMOND: Li demonstrates a classic Tai Chi pose called Part the Wild Horses Mane. He shifts from one foot to the other, a graceful zigzag, his arms also moving like scissors back and forth. As he shifts, he leans forward in order to practice and build balance, something most people can do without thinking.

LI: For example, reaching out for an object, transitioning from seated to standing or from standing back to seated.

NEIGHMOND: In the study, Li divided Parkinson's patients into three groups. One group did resistance training with weights. Another, stretching classes. And the third, Tai Chi. Each group participated in a 60-minute class twice a week for six months. When they finished, Li found the Tai Chi patients were stronger and had much better balance.

LI: Four times better than those patients assigned to stretching group; about two times better than those in the resistance training group, in regards to improvements in balance.

NEIGHMOND: And that led to significantly fewer falls for patients in the Tai Chi group. Leona Maricle says that before Tai Chi, she lost her balance eight to 10 times a day. Now it hardly ever happens. She recently even saved herself from what would have been a sure fall, before Tai Chi. It was raining and dark and she tripped on the curb as she got out of her car.

MARICLE: Suddenly I have to make a little jump, which was unheard of before. But I kind of gave it a little jump and I brought my foot up above the curb and could steady myself on the ground next to the curb. That would have been a fall for sure six or eight months ago.

NEIGHMOND: Researchers don't know exactly how Tai Chi works to restore balance. UCLA brain scientist Dr. Michael Irwin says it may retrain areas of the brain that control movement.

DR. MICHAEL IRWIN: There's a memory component of our nerves and they're receiving signals from our body all the time that are integrated by the brain. And I think one of the things that happens with Tai Chi is it's bringing awareness of the brain to these areas of the body that we often sort of neglect - we sort of take for granted.

NEIGHMOND: Things like balancing when we stand up or just walk. Now Irwin's researching other potential benefits of Tai Chi.

Patti Neighmond. NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.