Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Stocks Take Dive, As Greek Bailout Deal Remains Uncertain

Feb 10, 2012

Just a day after it appeared that Greece and its eurozone partners had reached a deal, we're back where we've been for months: There are fiery protests on the streets of Athens, the markets and the euro are in turmoil and negotiations are at a tense point with four Greek Cabinet ministers tendering resignations over their opposition to austerity measures.

Here's the how the AP rounds up the latest:

"Investors had breathed a sigh of relief Thursday after Greek Prime Minister Lucas Papademos and the heads of the three parties backing his government agreed to private sector wage cuts, civil service layoffs and cuts in government spending.

"But finance ministers from the other 16 countries that use the euro insisted that Greece save an extra euro325 million ($430 million), pass the cuts through parliament and guarantee that they will be enforced after planned elections in April.

At stake is whether Greece will receive another round of international bailout money. If it doesn't, analysts expect the country will default on its debt and that could send shock waves across the world.

As the Financial Times puts it, the extra 325 million euros, put off George Karatzaferis, "head of the LAOS party — a far-right minority member of the unity government." Three of the party's Cabinet members offered their resignations and according to The Guardian, which is live-blogging the situation, Deputy Foreign Minister Mariliza Xenogiannakopoulou has also resigned.

The threat of austerity measures also led the country's two biggest trade unions to call for a 48-hour strike, which shutdown government offices, schools and publish transport, among other things today.

The FT sets the scene in Athens:

"A battery of loudspeakers outside the finance ministry urged: 'Rebel now, keep striking, don't give in,' as protesters streamed into central Syntagma square.

"'We don't have much more to lose,' said Stavros, a 28-year-old architect as he sprayed graffiti on a shuttered department store. 'Six years studying, another doing military service and no chance of a job ... What can you expect?'"

The Guardian reports that all this turmoil will ultimately come to a head on Sunday, when the Greek parliament votes on whether to accept the austerity measures.

Meanwhile, partially on the Greek news, the Dow is down 1 percent, with the Nasdaq and S&P in similarly negative territory.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.