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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

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States Fail In Fight Against Sex Trafficking

Dec 1, 2011
Originally published on December 1, 2011 5:10 am

Too many states still inadvertently provide safe havens when it comes to sex trafficking — even when children on the streets bear the consequences. That's the conclusion of a new report released Thursday by the advocacy group Shared Hope International.

The study grades each state on whether it has laws to protect children who are pushed into the sex trade — and to punish the adults who seek out those services. Leaders of the group say there's lots of room for improvement. More than half of the states they examined got grades of D or F.

"I was absolutely shocked when we started sending people into states [posing] as sex tourists, and they would go in, and they would come into the city maybe from another country, maybe from another state, and they could buy kids so easily," says former Republican Rep. Linda Smith of Washington. Smith founded Shared Hope International after she left Capitol Hill.

Smith tells NPR that she's devoting all her energy to making life harder for criminals and to helping victims, especially children, who are trafficked for sex and domestic work.

Laws in Washington state and Texas are strong, Smith says, but many other states are falling down on the job — miserably.

"They didn't have trafficking laws, or if they had a trafficking law, it didn't deal with commercial sex ... or didn't distinguish between children and adults," Smith says. She says the report, prepared with the American Center for Law and Justice, is designed to help states draft model laws to help fight trafficking.

And she has an important ally: the National Association of Attorneys General, which put the fight against human trafficking at the top of its agenda this year.

The president of NAAG, Washington state Attorney General Rob McKenna, says there's a lot of work to be done.

"In our understanding of human trafficking, we are today about where we were with the problem of domestic violence about 40 years ago," he says — "low levels of awareness, low levels of law enforcement response, almost no services for victims."

McKenna says the area is so misunderstood that experts still aren't sure how many victims suffer every year. He says estimates start at around 100,000 people in the U.S.

Around the world, he says, the United Nations and U.S. data show human trafficking ranks only behind narcotics as one of the most lucrative and fastest-growing criminal enterprises.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

American states are not doing enough to help prevent child sex trafficking. That's the bottom line of a new report out today, which gives a failing grade to more than half the states in the country. The study grades every state on whether it has laws on the books to protect children who are pushed into the sex trade, and to punish the adults who seek out those services. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Too many states still inadvertently provide a safe haven inside the U.S. when it comes to sex trafficking, even when children on the streets bear the consequences. That's the conclusion of a new study by the advocacy group Shared Hope International, along with the American Center for Law and Justice. Linda Smith is a former Republican member of Congress from Washington state. She founded Shared Hope International after she left Capitol Hill.

LINDA SMITH: I was absolutely shocked when we started sending people into states as sex tourists. And they would go in, and they would come into the city - maybe from another country, maybe another state - and they could buy kids so easily.

JOHNSON: Smith says she's devoting all her energy to making life harder for criminals and to helping victims, especially children, who are trafficked for sex and domestic work. Laws in Washington state and Texas are strong, she says, but many other states are falling down on the job, miserably.

Lately, she's got an important ally: the National Association of Attorneys General. It's a group made up of the top prosecutors in each state. And this year, they've put the fight against human trafficking at the top of their agenda. Rob McKenna is the attorney general in Washington state. He says there's a lot of work to be done.

ROB MCKENNA: In our understanding of human trafficking, we are today about where we were with the problem of domestic violence about 40 years ago - low levels of awareness, low levels of law-enforcement response, almost no services for victims.

JOHNSON: McKenna says the area is so misunderstood that experts still aren't sure how many victims suffer every year. He says estimates start around a hundred-thousand people in the U.S. And around the world, he says, the United Nations and U.S. data show human trafficking ranks only behind narcotics as one of the most lucrative and fast-growing criminal enterprises.

Carrie Johnson, NPR News, Washington.

INSKEEP: And you'll find a link to the new report at NPR.org. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.