Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped vegetables and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Pages

Star-Studded 'Heiress' Considers A Woman's Worth

Oct 28, 2012
Originally published on October 28, 2012 10:58 am

A much-anticipated revival of The Heiress, a 1947 play based on the Henry James novella Washington Square, opens in New York on Thursday. It marks the Broadway debut of two accomplished young stars — Jessica Chastain, the Academy Award nominee from The Help, and Dan Stevens, from the hit television series Downton Abbey.

On the surface, the story of The Heiress seems simple enough — a wealthy young woman in Victorian New York is torn between her controlling father and a young, penniless suitor. Is the father being overprotective? Is the young man just a cad? But there's much more going on, says director Moisés Kaufman.

"Henry James — because his brother, William James, was a psychologist — he really understood a lot about human psychology and he got so much so right so early on," Kaufman says. He describes the revival as "very Jamesian" in its darkness and ambiguity.

"Henry James doesn't write about villains and saints," Kaufman says. "He writes about people with flesh and blood. And one of the things that we kept talking about in this play was that those kind of ambiguities make the production richer."

Hollywood star Jessica Chastain plays the heiress, Catherine, and David Straithairn plays her father, Dr. Austin Sloper. The petite red-haired Chastain is all but unrecognizable in a tangled wig of frizzy brown hair and a jangle of awkward mannerisms, playing an only child trying desperately to get her father's approval. Chastain says she was attracted to the role because of the character's arc.

"The story's very relevant because throughout history, women have been defined by the men in their life," she says. "And Catherine, in the beginning of the play is defined by her father and then she's defined by her suitor and at the end, she sets boundaries and she's defined by herself. And I'm really moved by that."

The man who wants Catherine is the charming, handsome, but nearly destitute Morris Townsend. Dan Stevens says he didn't want to play Morris as some sort of mustache-twirling villain, only out to get the heiress' $30,000 a year.

"This is true of a lot of Henry James characters, that the two things are not necessarily mutually exclusive; that you can be in love with somebody and also with their things and their lifestyle and the luxury which they inhabit," he says. "So that's, you know, an interesting thing to look at and to play with."

Kaufman says the script, by Augustus and Ruth Goetz, focuses on the ideas of truth and honesty, but in very much the manner of 1850s New York.

"The way that they deal with each other ... has much more to do with Victorian propriety than it has to do with contemporary psychology," Kaufman says. "And by that I mean, that there's a way in which they're very frank and a way in which they are not ... in which they really keep lying to each other, for a variety of reasons, some of which are very good reasons."

The play reaches one of its climaxes when the doctor bluntly tells Catherine why he is so opposed to her engagement to Morris and his own doubts about her self worth.

"I have been reasonable with you," Sloper says to his daughter. "I have tried not to be unkind, but now it is time for you to realize the truth: How many women do you think [Morris] might have had in this town? ... 100 are prettier, 1,000 more clever, but you have one virtue which outshines them all. ... Your money."

"It is devastating, when your whole life has been about ... [pleasing] your father," Chastain says. "But also, for me, I imagine there's a great sense of freedom; so, to actually know: OK, my instinct was right. He doesn't like me. Now, after knowing this, how can I move on in my life?"

How Catherine Sloper moves on with her life turns out to be both heartbreaking and surprising.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Next week, a much-anticipated revival of "The Heiress" opens in New York. It's a 1947 play based on the Henry James novella "Washington Square." The show marks the Broadway debut of two accomplished, young stars: Jessica Chastain, the Academy Award nominee from "The Help"; and Dan Stevens, of the hit television series "Downton Abbey."

Jeff Lunden brings us the story.

JEFF LUNDEN, BYLINE: On the surface, the story of "The Heiress" seems simple enough. A wealthy, young woman in Victorian New York is torn between her controlling father and a young, penniless suitor. Is the father being overprotective? Is the young man just a cad? There's much more going on, says director Moises Kaufman.

MOISES KAUFMAN: Henry James - because his brother, William James, was a psychologist - he really understood a lot about human psychology. And he got so much so right, so early on.

LUNDEN: Kaufman describes the revival as very Jamesian, in its darkness and ambiguity.

KAUFMAN: Henry James doesn't write about villains and saints. He writes about people with flesh and blood. And one of the things that we kept talking about, in this play, was that those kinds of ambiguities make the production richer.

LUNDEN: Hollywood star Jessica Chastain plays the heiress, Catherine; and David Strathairn, her father, Dr. Austin Sloper. The petite, red-haired Chastain is all but unrecognizable in a tangled wig of frizzy, brown hair and a jangle of awkward mannerisms; playing an only child trying desperately to get her father's approval. Chastain says she was attracted to the role because of the character's arc.

JESSICA CHASTAIN: This story's very relevant because throughout history, women have been defined by the men in their life. And Catherine, in the beginning of the play, is defined by her father; and then, she's defined by her suitor. And at the end, she sets boundaries; and she's defined by herself. And I'm really moved by that.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY REHEARSAL, "THE HEIRESS")

CHASTAIN: (as Catherine Sloper) Oh, father, don't you think he is the most beautiful man you have ever seen?

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

DAVID STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) He is very good-looking, my dear. But of course, you wouldn't let that sway you unduly.

CHASTAIN: (as Catherine Sloper) Oh, no, no. But that is what is so wonderful to me - that he should have everything, everything that a woman could want; and he wants me.

LUNDEN: The man who wants Catherine is the charming, handsome, but nearly destitute Morris Townsend. Dan Stevens says he didn't want to play Morris as some sort of moustache-twirling villain, only out to get the heiress' $30,000 a year.

DAN STEVENS: This is true of a lot of Henry James characters - that the two things are not necessarily mutually exclusive; that you can be in love with somebody, and also with their things and their lifestyle, and the luxury which they inhabit. And so that's, you know, an interesting thing to look at, and to play with. And so, you know, that's what we've tried to do with this Morris. (LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY REHEARSAL, "THE HEIRESS")

STEVENS: (as Morris Townsend) Dr. Sloper, I have fallen in love with your daughter. I am not the kind of man you would chose for her, and for good reason. I have committed every folly, every indiscretion, a young man can find to commit. I have squandered an inheritance. I have gambled. I have drunk unwisely. I admit; I confess. All these things...

STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) Mr. Townsend, I am acting in the capacity of a judge, not your confessor.

STEVENS: (as Morris Townsend) I tell you these things myself, Doctor, because I love Catherine - and because I have a great deal at stake.

STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) Then you have lost it.

LUNDEN: Director Moises Kaufman says the script, by Augustus and Ruth Goetz, focuses on the ideas of truth and honesty, but in very much the manner of 1850s New York.

KAUFMAN: The way that they deal with each other, and that they deal with truth and the truth about each other, has much more to do with Victorian propriety than it has to do with contemporary psychology. And by that, I mean that there's a way in which they're very frank, and a way in which they are not; in a way in which they really, keep lying to each other - for a variety of reasons, some of which are very good reasons.

LUNDEN: The play reaches one of its climaxes when the doctor bluntly tells Catherine why he is so opposed to her engagement to Morris, and his own doubts about her self-worth.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY REHEARSAL, "THE HEIRESS")

STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) I have been reasonable with you. I have tried not to be unkind. But now, it is time for you to realize the truth. How many women do you think he might have had in this town?

CHASTAIN: (as Catherine Sloper) He finds me pleasing.

STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) Yes, I'm sure he does. A hundred are prettier; a thousand more clever. But you have one virtue which outshines them all.

CHASTAIN: (as Catherine Sloper)What? What is that?

STRATHAIRN: (as Dr. Austin Sloper) Your money.

LUNDEN: Jessica Chastain.

CHASTAIN: It is devastating when your whole life has been about - to please your father. But then also, for me - I imagine there's a great sense of freedom. So to actually know, OK, my instinct was right; he doesn't like me. Now, after knowing this, how can I move on, in my life?

LUNDEN: And how Catherine Sloper moves on with her life, turns out to be both heartbreaking and surprising. "The Heiress" opens this Thursday evening, at the Walter Kerr Theatre on Broadway.

For NPR News, I'm Jeff Lunden in New York. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.