New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Spain's Tomato Festival Shrinks, As Town Pares Crowd Size

Aug 29, 2013

The Tomatina Festival, the famous free-for-all in which partiers pelt one another with ripe tomatoes, was held in Bunol, Spain, Wednesday. The big party that has become an international sensation in recent years was smaller than usual in 2013 — for the first time, the town sold a limited number of tickets for 10 euros (about $13.25) to indulge in the huge food fight.

Some 20,000 people came to this year's festival, which featured 130 tons of tomatoes. That figure was about half of last year's reported crowd, due to the town's efforts to cut the size of the mob that invades it each summer. On normal days, Bunol has a population of about 9,000.

In addition to safety concerns that would come with cramming 50,000 excited, tomato-throwing strangers into its streets, Bunol is also trying to tame its debt, its mayor tells European news site The Local. Despite the ticket policy, the festival drew visitors from far outside Spain.

"Among the top ticket buyers were Australians with 19.2 percent of the total, Japanese with 17.9 percent, Britons with 11.2 percent, Spaniards with 7.8 percent and Americans with 7.5 percent," the site adds.

If you plan to attend La Tomatina next year, it's always held on the last Wednesday of August. And it does have some rules, including the requirement that any tomato be squashed a bit before it's hurled at another person. The battle lasts for one hour.

While they're the star attraction, tomatoes aren't the only food featured at the festival.

"Do not miss the Palojabón – a soap-covered pole with a Spanish ham at the top," the organizer's website says. "Whoever can climb the pole and get the ham can keep it!"

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.