NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Pages

Spain's Crisis Pushes Educated Into 'Economic Exile'

Jul 29, 2012
Originally published on July 29, 2012 9:48 pm

In Spain, the growing crisis — debt, austerity and joblessness — has prompted more people to vote with their feet. In the first six months of 2012, emigration from Spain is up more than 44 percent from the same period last year.

The Spanish government denies it, but the "brain drain" has become something of a flood with more and more educated, skilled Spaniards moving abroad.

Neurobiologist Elisa Cuevas Garcia from Madrid sips an iced espresso on a hot afternoon at an outdoor cafe in Berlin. She works researching a gene that one day might help treat central nervous system disorders, including spina bifida.

The Spanish government subsidized her training, but she left Spain a few years ago for a research post in Berlin where she's finishing up her Ph.D. The 27-year-old says nearly every one of her friends in the sciences has left for work abroad.

"We are all away — New York, Chicago, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Germany," she says. "But just one friend ... is still working on a lab in Spain, and I'm really worried about him."

More than 53 percent of those under 25 years of age in Spain are jobless, and overall a quarter of Spaniards are unemployed. That's the highest jobless level since Spain began keeping records.

Cuevas Garcia says when the economic crisis began, she thought maybe it'll be good to be away for a little while, let things improve, and then come back home with new work experience. But now, she says, returning home is simply not an option.

Spain's education minister, Jose Ignacio Wert, denies there's a brain drain. He notes that his government's emigration data show little information about education levels and other key details. Besides, he says, it's a global economy — people move around.

But Cuevas Garcia says the minister is dangerously misguided: Spain's talented young people are not just leaving as part of a globalized workforce. The crisis is forcing them away in droves, and she worries the damage will be long-term.

"It's a brain drain, and they keep denying it. ... It's reality. Let's say tomorrow you wake up, everything back to normal, crisis over — the damage already done is going to be really difficult to make up for," she says. "This makes me feel sad and frustrated because I know it's not a matter of time any more, it's a matter of generations. And you don't know how many."

Top European destinations for departing Spaniards are the UK, France and Germany. Language programs in both Spain and Germany report a steep rise in the number of Spaniards taking German classes. Government statistics show Germany's population this year increased for the first time in a decade, largely because of increased immigration.

There are language and culture challenges, but Cuevas Garcia says it's been worth it. Going back home to Spain for holidays, she sits next to cousins who are waiting for jobs that never come and gets approving nods from older relatives who understand she did what she had to.

"I'm not just paid for my job, I'm doing what I studied for," she says. "It's a privilege taking in account the current situation. So you really have this look from the elders saying, 'Wow, good for you.'"

She's doing a lot better than many young Spaniards, but she's still angry. She went to an anti-austerity demonstration recently at the Spanish Embassy in Berlin.

Spanish banks and home owners are in deep trouble, in large part because of a real estate bubble that burst. Cuevas Garcia says she's angry at her government for inaction during boom times, at banks for unbridled greed, and at fellow citizens who were apathetic as long as the housing prices kept going up.

"I remember hearing that my whole life: 'Just get some job, and just get into a mortgage, and if you don't want to live there anymore, you just sell it. It will always go up,' " she says. "And suddenly it didn't. It was like the base of all our beliefs, and suddenly that was not true anymore."

When she finishes her doctorate, she says she and her boyfriend — also a Spanish scientist living in Germany — are hoping to move to the U.S. Cuevas Garcia is resigned to what you might call "economic exile" — a long, long period away from home.

"I don't know if this second time I will start really noticing that I don't know where I belong anymore and that you really feel you are away," she says. "If I ever have kids, I don't know if they'll ever be able to go back to Spain the way I knew it. It will be very, very different."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

When a country sees its best and brightest fleeing, looking for opportunities elsewhere, some people call this a brain drain. And Spain may be seeing one, as we speak. The nation is in economic crisis and debt, austerity and joblessness all seem to be driving people away. In the first six months of 2012, emigration from Spain is up more than 44 percent from the same period last year. The Spanish government denies a brain drain, but many of the people leaving are skilled and more educated.

NPR's Eric Westervelt has one woman's story from Berlin.

ERIC WESTERVELT, BYLINE: Neurobiologist Elisa Cuevas Garcia from Madrid sips an iced espresso on a hot afternoon at an outdoor cafe in Berlin. She works researching a gene that one day might help treat central nervous system disorders, including spina bifida. The Spanish government subsidized her training. But she left Spain a few years ago for a research post in Berlin where she's finishing up her Ph.D. The 27-year-old says nearly every one of her friends in the sciences has left for work abroad.

ELISA CUEVAS GARCIA: We are all away: New York, Chicago, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Germany. But just one friend that I could say he's still working on a lab in Spain, and I'm really worried about him.

WESTERVELT: More than 53 percent of those under 25 years of age in Spain are jobless, and overall a quarter of Spaniards are unemployed. That's the highest jobless level since Spain began keeping records. Cuevas Garcia says when the economic crisis began she thought maybe it'll be good to be away for a little while, let things improve, and then I'll come back home with new work experience. But now, she says, returning home is simply not an option.

Spain's Education Minister Jose Ignacio Wert denies there's a brain drain. He notes that his government's emigration data show little information about education levels and other key details. And besides, he says, it's a global economy, people move around. But Cuevas Garcia says the minister is dangerously misguided. Spain's talented young people, she says are not just leaving as part of a globalized workforce, the crisis is forcing them away in droves and she worries the damage will be long term.

GARCIA: It's a brain drain and they keep denying it. But it's - yeah.

WESTERVELT: It's reality.

GARCIA: It's reality. Let's say tomorrow you wake up, everything goes back to normal, crisis over, the damage already done is going to be really difficult to make up for. This makes me feel sad and frustrated because you know it's not a matter of time anymore, it's a matter of generations and you don't know how many.

WESTERVELT: Top European destinations for Spaniards leaving are the U.K., France and Germany. Government statistics show Germany's population this year increased for the first time in a decade, largely because of increased immigration. There are language and culture challenges, but Cuevas Garcia says it's been worth it. Going back home to Spain for holidays, she sits next to cousins who are waiting for jobs that never come, and gets approving nods from older relatives who understand she did what she had to.

GARCIA: I'm not just paid for my job but I'm doing what I studied for. It's a privilege in taking in account the current situation. So you really have this look from the elders saying, wow, good for you.

WESTERVELT: She's doing a lot better than many young Spaniards, but she's still angry. She went to an anti-austerity demonstration recently at the Spanish embassy in Berlin.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

WESTERVELT: Spanish banks and home owners are in deep trouble in large part because of a real estate bubble that burst. Cuevas Garcia says she's angry at her government for inaction during boom times, at banks for unbridled greed, and at fellow citizens who were apathetic as long as the housing prices kept going up.

GARCIA: I remember hearing that my whole life. Get some job and just get into a mortgage and if you don't want to live there anymore, you just sell it. It will always go up. And suddenly it didn't. It was like the base of all our beliefs and suddenly that was not true anymore.

WESTERVELT: When she finishes her doctorate she says she and her boyfriend - also a Spanish scientist living in Germany - are hoping to move to the US. She's resigned to what you might call economic exile - a long, long period away from home.

GARCIA: I don't know if this second time I will start really noticing that I don't know where I belong anymore, and that you really feel you are away.

WESTERVELT: Right. Will it feel alienating?

GARCIA: Yes, I have this feeling.

WESTERVELT: If I ever have kids she adds, I don't know if they'll ever be able to go back to Spain the way I knew it, she says. It will be very, very different.

Eric Westervelt, NPR News, Berlin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.