"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Sophomoric? Members Of Congress Talk Like 10th Graders, Analysis Shows

May 21, 2012
Originally published on May 21, 2012 3:30 pm

Members of Congress are often criticized for what they do — or rather, what they don't do.

But what about what they say and, more specifically, how they say it? It turns out that the sophistication of congressional speech-making is on the decline, according to the open government group the Sunlight Foundation. Since 2005, the average grade level at which members of Congress speak has fallen by almost a full grade.

Every word members of Congress say on the floor of the House or Senate is documented in the Congressional Record. The Sunlight Foundation took the entire Congressional Record dating back to the 1990s and plugged it into a searchable database.

Lee Drutman, a political scientist at Sunlight, took all those speeches and ran them through an algorithm to determine the grade level of congressional discourse.

"We just kind of did it for fun, and I was kind of shocked when I plotted that data and I saw that, oh my God, there's been a real drop-off in the last several years," he says.

In 2005, Congress spoke at an 11.5 grade level on the Flesch-Kincaid scale. Now, it's 10.6. In other words, Congress dropped from talking like juniors to talking like sophomores.

Flesch-Kincaid equates higher grade levels with longer sentences and words with more syllables.

For example, just one sentence from the member of Congress with the highest grade ranking, Rep. Dan Lungren, a Republican from California, goes on for 62 words. (That sentence: "This Justice Department, in my judgment, based on the experience I've had here in this Congress, 18 years, my years as the chief legal officer of the state of California and 35 or 40 years as a practicing attorney tells me that this administration has fundamentally failed in its obligation to attempt to faithfully carry out the laws of the United States.")

Lungren's grade level during this session of Congress: 20. Overall since 1996: 16.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, Georgia Republican Rep. Rob Woodall registers the second-lowest grade level: 8.01.

An example of Woodall's speech: "What do they say about socialism, Mr. Speaker? It's a great plan until you run out of other people's money. Guess what? We've run out of other people's money. I just want to show you a chart."

That's five sentences, an average of about 7.5 words per sentence.

"My mother will probably be embarrassed to hear this news," Woodall says, "but I'm glad to know I'm not obfuscating our challenges with words that are too complicated."

Woodall is part of the large freshman class that came into Congress in 2010 — many of them backed by the Tea Party movement. Sunlight's Drutman says this infusion of new members looks to be part of the reason for the overall grade-level decline.

"Particularly among the newest members of Congress, as you move out from the center and toward either end of the political spectrum, the grade level goes down, and that pattern is particularly pronounced on the right," he says.

Of the 10 members speaking at the lowest grade level, all but two are freshmen, and every one is a Republican. For the record, though, Drutman isn't passing judgment about whether speaking at a lower grade level is a good thing or a bad thing.

South Carolina Republican Rep. Mick Mulvaney ranks the very lowest, with a grade level of 7.94.

"Gosh, I guess I should be disappointed that I'm not using my higher education to better use, but, oh well," Mulvaney says. "I hope people don't take it as a substitute for lack of intellect, but small words can be just as powerful as big words sometimes."

Mulvaney graduated with honors from Georgetown and earned a law degree at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His father was a high school grammar teacher.

"I was trained to write in a clear and concise fashion, and you didn't use big words if small words would do," he says. "Certainly I'm not trying to dumb down the message by any stretch of the imagination."

Frank Luntz, a Republican consultant and language guru, puts it this way: "It's not an issue of dumbing it down; it's an issue of cleaning it up."

He says there was a time when members seemed to use the biggest, most complicated phrases possible and didn't really worry about whether the public could understand them. Now, he says, members are no longer just talking to each other. They're talking to the public through cable TV and YouTube.

"Life has changed," Luntz says. "They not only expect but they demand that members of Congress communicate in a way that is more understandable and more meaningful to them."

The average reading level of Americans is between eighth and ninth grade. Oh, and in case you were wondering, this story was written at an 8.2 grade level.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's go now to a story about what congressional lawmakers say, and more specifically, how they say it. A new analysis is being released today measuring the level of sophistication of congressional speech-making. It finds that over the past several years the average school grade level that members of Congress speak at has fallen by nearly a full grade. In some cases, lawmakers are using wording that is at the level of middle school.

Here's NPR congressional reporter Tamara Keith.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Every word members of Congress say on the floor of the House or the Senate is documented in the congressional record. An organization called the Sunlight Foundation took the entire congressional record, dating back to the 1990s, and plugged it into a searchable database.

Lee Drutman is a political scientist at Sunlight. He took all those speeches and ran them through an algorithm to determine the grade level of congressional discourse.

LEE DRUTMAN: We just kind of did it for fun and I was kind of shocked when I plotted that data and I saw that, oh my God, there's been a real drop-off in the last several years.

KEITH: In 2005, Congress spoke an 11.5 grade level on the Flesch-Kincaid scale. Now it's 10.6. Congress dropped from being juniors to being sophomores. Flesch-Kincaid equates higher grade levels with longer sentences and words with more syllables. This is just one sentence from the congressman with the highest grade ranking, Dan Lungren, a Republican from California.

REPRESENTATIVE DAN LUNGREN: This Justice Department, in my judgment, based on the experience I've had here in this Congress, 18 years...

KEITH: This one sentence goes on for 62 words.

LUNGREN: ...and 35 or 40 years as a practicing attorney, tells me that this administration has fundamentally failed in its obligation...

KEITH: Lungren's grade level this Congress: 20. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Georgia Republican Rob Woodall registers the second-lowest grade level: 8.01.

REPRESENTATIVE ROB WOODALL: What do they say about socialism, Mr. Speaker? It's a great plan until you run out of other people's money? Guess what? We've run out of other people's money. I just want to show you a chart.

KEITH: That's five sentences, an average of seven and a half words per sentence.

WOODALL: My mother will probably be embarrassed to hear this news, but I'm glad to know I'm not obfuscating our challenges with words that are too complicated.

KEITH: Woodall is part of the large freshman class that came into Congress in 2010, many of them backed by the Tea Party movement. Sunlight's Lee Drutman says this infusion of new members looks to be part of the reason for the overall grade level decline.

DRUTMAN: Particularly among the newest members of Congress. As you move out from the center and towards either end of the political spectrum, the grade level goes down, and that pattern is particularly pronounced on the right.

KEITH: Of the 10 members speaking at the lowest grade level, all but two are freshmen, and every one is a Republican. For the record, though, Drutman isn't passing judgment about whether speaking at a lower grade level is a good thing or a bad thing. South Carolina Republican Mick Mulvaney ranks the very lowest, with a grade level of 7.94.

REPRESENTATIVE MICK MULVANEY: Gosh, I guess I should be disappointed that I'm not using my higher education to better use, but oh well. I hope people don't take it as a substitute for lack of intellect, but small words can be just as powerful as big words sometimes.

KEITH: Mulvaney graduated with honors from Georgetown and went on to get a law degree at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. And get this: His dad was a high school grammar teacher.

MULVANEY: And I was trained to write in a clear and concise fashion, and you didn't use big words if small words would do. Certainly I'm not trying to dumb down the message by any stretch of the imagination.

FRANK LUNTZ: It's not an issue of dumbing it down. It's an issue of cleaning it up.

KEITH: Frank Luntz is a Republican consultant and language guru. He says there was a time when members seemed to use the biggest, most complicated phrases possible and didn't really worry about whether the public could understand them. He says members are no longer just talking to each other. They're talking to the public, through cable TV and YouTube.

LUNTZ: Life has changed. They not only expect but they demand that members of Congress communicate in a way that is more understandable and more meaningful to them.

KEITH: The average reading level of Americans is between eighth and ninth grade. Oh, and in case you were wondering, this story was written at an 8.2 grade level. Tamara Keith, NPR News, the Capitol. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.