Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Some Go Far For Their Mega Millions Tickets

Mar 30, 2012

With $540 million (wait — it just went up to $640 million!) on the line, it's not surprising that Alabama resident Lance Larka is willing to drive across the state line for a chance to win the record Mega Millions jackpot.

Larka, 38, runs a DNA sequencing lab in Huntsville. Alabama is one of eight states (also Alaska, Florida, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, plus Puerto Rico) that aren't part of the Mega Millions. So, he decided to increase his odds from exactly zero to, well, something slightly better.

After hearing of the huge jackpot on local NPR station WLRH, he jumped in the car this morning and drove 25 miles to an area known as "lottery mile" in Tennessee to buy 60 tickets for himself and his employees.

"It was a zoo," he says of the scene at the store where he bought his tickets. "There were about 30 cars in the parking lot and all but one of them had Alabama plates."

Inside the store, he says, there were two cash registers, each 20 customers deep.

In Mississippi, which also has no lottery, Jacob Deiwert, a 39-year-old mortuary student living in Jackson decided to drive to Talullah in neighboring Louisiana today to buy his ticket.

"My odds are low, of course, but I've spent at worst $20. If I win, I move to Mexico. Travel. Help out family. The usual stuff," he says.

You might say lottery mania knows no boundaries: In a post on NPR's Facebook page, Dawn Pencil of Utah (another non-Mega Millions state), says she was having her brother in Chicago buy her a ticket.

And then there's Sumet Ninsuvannakul, a resident of Bangkok, Thailand, who has a friend in D.C. who is getting him a ticket.

Beth Kopf-Wulff, also responding to the NPR Facebook post, says her husband is a truck driver and buys a few tickets in each state he passes through.

"It's fun to dream of all the lives we could change with that kind of money," she says.

Larka, from Alabama, says if he wins, he will use the money to expand his business and help his wife open a restaurant.

As for his employees, "we don't really have a pact or anything," he says.

"If they win, I hope they'd stay with me. If I win, I could guarantee them job security," he says. "In this economy, that's not such a bad thing."

The drawing is set for 11 p.m. ET tonight. There is, of course, the chance that no one will win. Which means the mania will be repeated when Mega Millions numbers are drawn again next Tuesday.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.