Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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To Solve Hacking Case, Feds Get Hacker Of Their Own

Mar 6, 2012

Federal prosecutors have charged five men with responsibility for some of the biggest computer hacks in the past few years. The FBI says the hackers penetrated the computer systems of businesses like Fox Broadcasting and Sony Pictures, stole confidential information and splashed it all over the Internet.

But what's most unusual about the case is how investigators cracked it — with the help of an insider who became a secret government informant.

The Justice Department team relied on Hector Monsegur, a well-known hacker from New York, who uses the online handle Sabu.

Monsegur, 28, secretly pleaded guilty in August 2011 to a dozen criminal charges, including conspiracy, computer hacking and identity theft. Prosecutors say he faces up to 124 years in prison.

To limit his prison sentence, Monsegur has apparently been leading investigators in real time through the hazy world of high stakes computer hacking — helping get around one of the biggest hurdles to a successful prosecution.

"Well the law enforcement challenge posed by these types of online conspiracies generally is that the members of the group likely have never met ... very often don't know each others' true identities," says Mike DuBose, a managing director and leader of the cyber-investigations unit at the Kroll security firm.

DuBose says "proactive cooperation" can be essential to cracking the code.

The court papers don't specify exactly what Monsegur may have done, but they do describe more than two years of high-profile hacks against some of America's largest businesses.

The Justice Department says many of the hackers belonged to a loose group of electronic vigilantes that called itself the Internet Feds, "waging a deliberate campaign of online destruction."

"You might call them a digital lynch mob 'cause they go around sort of randomly attacking people they're unhappy with," says Stewart Baker, a cybersecurity lawyer at the firm Steptoe & Johnson.

According to an investigation that stretched across five U.S. states and all the way to Scotland Yard, the list of attacks grew and grew.

Most of the action dates to early 2011, when the men allegedly conspired to break into a computer security firm known as HB Gary. They took sensitive documents about the firm's clients and exposed them for public view.

Next, they targeted the computer systems of Fox, grabbing information about more than 70,000 contestants who vied to appear on the X Factor music show.

And in May 2011 they formed a new high-profile group — Lulz Security — which targeted PBS after its show Frontline broadcast a story about the website WikiLeaks. The collective retaliated by posting a bogus story on the PBS website claiming the rapper Tupac Shakur was actually alive and living in New Zealand.

The campaign raged on this year — this time, targeting law enforcement. In January, Donncha O'Cearrbhail, a member of the hacking group based in Ireland, allegedly broke into the personal email account of an Irish policeman.

He learned the FBI and international authorities were planning to discuss ongoing investigations of computer hackers. Then, prosecutors say, the hacker secretly recorded the call and shared it with others.

"This group was unrepentant enough and did enough damage and became prominent enough that I think the book's going to get thrown at them," Baker says.

The other defendants include Ryan Ackroyd, Jake Davis and Darren Martyn, who each face up to 10 years in prison; and Jeremy Hammond, who's charged with hacking into Strategic Forecasting Inc. in December 2011 and stealing credit card information about some of the Austin, Texas, company's clients.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Federal prosecutors have charged five men in connection with some of the biggest computer hacks in the last few years. The FBI says the hackers penetrated the computer systems of businesses, including Fox Broadcasting and Sony Pictures. They allegedly stole confidential information and splashed it all over the Internet. The FBI cracked the case with the help of an insider.

Here is more from NPR's Carrie Johnson.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: The Justice Department says many of the hackers belong to a loose group of electronic vigilantes that calls itself the Internet Feds, waging a deliberate campaign of online destruction.

Stewart Baker is a cyber security lawyer in Washington.

STEWART BAKER: You might call them a digital lynch mob 'cause they go around randomly attacking people that they're unhappy with.

JOHNSON: According to an investigation that stretched across five U.S. states and all the way to Scotland Yard, that list of attacks grew and grew. Most of the action dates to early 2011, when the men allegedly conspired to break into a computer security firm known as HB Gary. They took sensitive documents about the firm's clients and exposed them for public view.

Next, they targeted the computer systems of Fox, grabbing information about 70,000 contestants who vied to appear on the "X Factor" music show. And in May 2011, they formed a new high profile group, Lulz Security, which targeted PBS after its show "Frontline" broadcast a story about the website WikiLeaks. The collective retaliated by posting a bogus story on the PBS website claiming the rapper Tupac Shakur was actually alive and living in New Zealand.

Again, Baker.

BAKER: This group was unrepentant enough and did enough damage and became prominent enough that I think the book's going to get thrown at them.

JOHNSON: The campaign raged on this year - this time, targeting law enforcement. In January, a member of the hacking group based in Ireland allegedly broke into the personal email account of an Irish policeman. He learned the FBI and international authorities were planning to discuss ongoing investigations of computer hackers. Then, prosecutors say, the hacker secretly recorded the call and shared it with others.

Mike DuBose leads the cyber investigations group at the Kroll security firm.

MIKE DUBOSE: The law enforcement challenge posed by these types of online conspiracies generally is that the members of the group likely have never met, very often don't know each others' true identities.

JOHNSON: But in this case, prosecutors relied on Hector Monsegur, a well-known hacker from the Lower East Side of New York, who uses the online handle Sabu. Monsegur secretly pleaded guilty in August 2011 to a dozen criminal charges, including conspiracy, computer hacking, and identity theft. Since then, to limit his prison sentence, he's apparently been leading investigators in real time through the hazy world of high stakes computer hacking.

Dubose of Kroll says proactive cooperation can be essential to cracking the code.

Carrie Johnson, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.