Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

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When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

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It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Shutdown: A Guide To What Would And Wouldn't Close

Sep 30, 2013
Originally published on September 30, 2013 8:05 pm

With House Republicans and Senate Democrats still miles apart on a budget deal, the federal government appears headed for a shutdown at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday.

Here's a quick breakdown of what government agencies and programs would and would not remain operational in the event of a shutdown:

What Stays Open

  • The Postal Service would continue to deliver mail on its regular schedule.
  • The Federal Reserve, as a self-funded agency, would remain completely functional.
  • Active-service military personnel would remain on the job.
  • Food stamps would still be available through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
  • Unemployment benefits would still be distributed.
  • Transportation Security Administration, air traffic control and border patrol officers would stay on duty.
  • Entitlement programs: Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid checks would get sent out.
  • Courts: The Supreme Court would be mostly unaffected, and federal courts could continue to operate for two weeks.
  • Obamacare exchanges: The Affordable Care Act's state-run exchanges would open Tuesday as planned.
  • The federal school lunch program is expected to stay intact through at least the end of October.
  • Unlike in previous shutdown scenarios, the State Department would have the ability to continue issuing visas and passports due to a recent budget change. Some applications could still be delayed, however.

What Gets Closed

  • National parks, museums and the National Zoo would be closed to the public.
  • Environmental Protection Agency administrator Gina McCarthy warned last week that a government shutdown would mean "that EPA effectively shuts down."
  • The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) would run out of money.
  • The Department of Housing and Urban Development would be unable to provide funds to local housing authorities.

Partial Shutdowns

  • White House: Around three-fourths of White House staffers would face furloughs.
  • The Internal Revenue Service would continue to collect taxes, but would be forced to suspend other services, such as audits and examinations of returns.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs would still offer medical services, but after a few weeks it would be unable to process benefits payments.
  • The Food and Drug Administration would still execute recalls of food and drugs, but would be unable to maintain much of its usual oversight.
  • The Energy Department would mostly shut down, aside from a few offices, including the one charged with oversight of the country's nuclear arsenal.
  • The Securities and Exchange Commission would continue to post corporate filings to its website, but staff members wouldn't be able to review them.
  • Most Department of Homeland Security operations would not be affected, but its e-Verify program, which allows businesses to check the legal immigration status of its employees, would shut down.
  • The National Institutes of Health would still be able to conduct some research and provide services to current patients, but would not be able to accept any new patients.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would have "significantly reduced capacity" in responding to outbreaks and processing laboratory samples, but would "continue minimal support to protect the health and well-being of U.S. citizens."
  • All Library of Congress buildings would close to the public and researchers. All public events would be cancelled and most websites would be inaccessible.
Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.