The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The middle of summer is when the surprises in publishing turn up. I'm talking about those quietly commanding books that publishers tend to put out now, because fall and winter are focused on big books by established authors. Which brings us to The Dream Life of Astronauts, by Patrick Ryan, a very funny and touching collection of nine short stories that take place in the 1960s and '70s around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

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Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

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President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

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The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

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This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

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Should We Prohibit Genetically Engineered Babies?

Feb 19, 2013
Originally published on February 19, 2013 3:59 pm

What if, before your children were born, you could make sure they had the genes to be taller or smarter? Would that tempt you, or would you find it unnerving?

What if that genetic engineering would save a child from a rare disease?

As advancements in science bring these ideas closer to reality, a group of experts faced off two against two in an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate on the proposition: "Prohibit Genetically Engineered Babies."

Before the debate, 24 percent of the audience supported the idea of prohibiting genetic engineering of babies, while 30 percent were against. Forty-six percent were undecided. After each side presented its case, 41 percent of the audience voted for the motion, "Prohibit Genetically Engineered Babies," while 49 percent sided with the experts arguing against it — making them the winners of the debate.

Those debating were:

FOR THE MOTION

Sheldon Krimsky is the Lenore Stern professor of humanities and social sciences in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University. He is also an adjunct professor in public health and family medicine in Tufts' School of Medicine and a visiting professor at Brooklyn College. Krimsky's research has focused on the links between science and technology, ethics and values, and public policy. He is the author of more than 180 papers and 11 books, including Genetic Justice: DNA Data Banks, Criminal Investigations, and Civil Liberties (2010), and the co-editor of Genetic Explanations: Sense and Nonsense (2013). Krimsky has been elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for "seminal scholarship exploring the normative dimensions and moral implications of science in its social context."

Robert Winston, a professor of science and society and emeritus professor of fertility studies at Imperial College London, runs a research program in the Institute of Reproductive and Developmental Biology on transgenic technology in animal models, with a long-term aim of improving human transplantation. His research led to the development of gynecological microsurgery in the 1970s and various improvements in reproductive medicine, particularly in the field of endocrinology and IVF. His work on preimplantation genetic diagnosis enabled families carrying gene defects to have children free of fatal illnesses. He has been a visiting professor at a number of American, Australian and European universities, and was president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 2005. He is a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

AGAINST THE MOTION

Nita A. Farahany studies the ethical, legal and social implications of biosciences and emerging technologies, particularly those related to neuroscience and behavioral genetics. She holds a joint appointment as professor of law at Duke Law and professor at Duke University's Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy. In 2010, she was appointed by President Obama to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. She also is the editor of The Impact of Behavioral Sciences on Criminal Law (2011), a book of essays from experts in science, law, philosophy and policy. In 2011, Farahany served as a visiting associate professor of law and the Leah Kaplan visiting professor of human rights at Stanford Law School. She teaches courses related to criminal law and criminal procedure, along with courses at the intersection of law, science and philosophy.

Lee M. Silver is professor of molecular biology and public policy at Princeton University. He is also a founder and principal science adviser of GenePeeks, a personal genome company. Silver is an elected lifetime fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a recipient of a National Institutes of Health MERIT award for outstanding research in genetics. Silver has authored an undergraduate textbook in genetics and genomics, a postgraduate textbook in mammalian genetics, and two books for a general audience, Challenging Nature and Remaking Eden. He has also authored more than 200 scientific articles, written opinion pieces for The New York Times and other publications, and has appeared on numerous television and radio programs, including on NPR. Silver collaborated with the playwright Jeremy Kareken on the play Sweet, Sweet Motherhood.

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