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Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

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The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

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A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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In A Shift From 2008 Race, Obama's Hush On Climate

Oct 25, 2012
Originally published on October 26, 2012 5:57 pm

This story is part of a two-part series about the presidential candidates' climate policies. Click Here For The Story About Mitt Romney

Both presidential candidates have all but ignored climate change during this election season. Mitt Romney would not make it a priority if he were president.

President Obama, in contrast, is pushing clean energy. But he usually avoids talking about that policy as a means to address global warming — which scientists view as one of the most serious long-term issues facing the planet. That's a political calculation that doesn't please some in the environmental movement.

"We have a president who ran in 2008 on trying to solve global warming, and he hasn't mentioned it at all on the campaign trail," says Erich Pica, president of Friends of the Earth Action.

Pica has kind things to say about Obama's policy to make cars more energy-efficient, his renewable energy push and other actions that will slow the nation's carbon emissions. But it's not enough to make a serious dent in global warming. Pica says climate should be a top issue in this presidential campaign, not stuck near the bottom of the list, where it is now.

"The president has a bully pulpit, so he could make it a top 10 issue if he chose to do so," Pica says. "You can lead by following the polls, which means you're leading from behind. Or you can take an issue, as cataclysmic as a climate crisis or climate disruption will be, and you can lead the American people to solutions."

That may be noble public policy, but Frank Maisano at the energy lobbying firm Bracewell and Giuliani says it's not good politics. This election is largely about jobs and the economy, and introducing climate change isn't engaging voters on the issues they care about.

"The big flaw in the environmentalists' pushing for climate, climate, climate is they don't understand the policy disconnect with many of the political challenges that we face," Maisano says. "They just aren't realistic with what is the art of the possible."

Tackling climate ultimately means making major changes in the fossil fuels-driven economy. That's not a conversation you necessarily want to start while the economy is weak. People are simply concerned about getting or keeping a job, and how much they pay for gasoline and electricity.

Paul Bledsoe, who dealt with climate policy in the Clinton White House, says the Obama campaign has a whole new perspective on the issue compared with four years ago.

"After talking about it a lot in 2008, as [Republican challenger] John McCain did, I think they've decided that the economy is such a paramount issue that it's better to talk about the economic side of clean energy rather than the climate change side," Bledsoe says.

And indeed, we have heard a lot from the president about building a renewable energy industry in this country. Put in simple terms, he talks about clean energy, more jobs. But he has not been connecting the dots to global warming. Bledsoe says the issue became a bit of a loser during the past four years.

"Part of the president's reluctance to talk about climate change stems from the political mishandling of the issue in the first two years of his presidency," Bledsoe says. "The White House made a decision to stick with a plan they came up with before the great economic recession, and it didn't go down well in Congress. A lot of people believe they should have trimmed their sails. And so they feel they've been burned politically."

Cap-and-trade policies to address climate change by putting a price on carbon became a lightning rod for the Tea Party movement and proved costly for some politicians in the 2010 election.

And President Obama has the environmental vote, whether he talks about climate change or not. So that's little incentive to raise the topic. But Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, says it could help the president attract some undecided voters, according to recent polling data.

"Undecideds are much more like Obama voters when it comes to their belief in climate change, the causes of climate change, their desire for action by the president and Congress," Leiserowitz says. "They're almost identical to 'likely' Obama voters."

And if those undecided voters are feeling put off by the relentless conversation about jobs, the economy, health care and the other top-tier issues, Leiserowitz says, they might just respond with a pitch on climate change. But with the days ticking down to the election, there seems to be little inclination to introduce this potentially divisive issue into the conversation.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

When it comes to the presidential campaign, President Obama and Mitt Romney have at least one thing in common: Both have tried hard not to talk about climate change. Yesterday, we outlined Romney's position. He embraces the scientific consensus that global warming is happening, but he does not think humans are largely to blame and has no plans to reduce carbon emissions.

Today, President Obama's position. As NPR's Richard Harris reports, the president is clearly pushing clean energy but he's not talking about it in terms of climate change.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: Scientific academies around the world say climate change is one of the most serious long-term issues facing the planet. And many environmental organizations have refocused their efforts to concentrate on climate change. These days, some are feeling a bit betrayed on the topic.

ERICH PICA: We have a president who ran in 2008 on trying to solve global warming, and he hasn't mentioned it at all on the campaign trail.

HARRIS: Erich Pica is president of Friends of the Earth Action. Pica has kind things to say about Mr. Obama's policy to make cars more energy efficient, his renewable energy push and other actions that will slow the nation's carbon emissions. But it's not enough. Pica says climate should be a top issue in this presidential campaign, not stuck near the bottom of the list, where it is now.

PICA: Well, the president has a bully pulpit and so he could make it a top 10 issue, if he chose to do so. You can lead by following the polls, which means you're leading from behind. Or you can take an issue, as cataclysmic as a climate crisis or climate disruption will be, and you can lead the American people to solutions.

HARRIS: That may be noble public policy. But Frank Maisano, at the energy lobbying firm Bracewell and Giuliani, says it's not good politics. This election is largely about jobs and the economy, and introducing climate change isn't engaging voters on the issues they care about.

FRANK MAISANO: The big flaw in the environmentalists' pushing for climate, climate, climate, is they don't understand the policy disconnect with many of the political challenges that we face. They're just not realistic when it comes to what is the art of the possible.

HARRIS: Tackling climate change ultimately means making major changes in the fossil fuels-driven economy. That's not a conversation you necessarily want to start while the economy is weak. People are simply concerned about getting or keeping a job, and how much they pay for gasoline and electricity.

Paul Bledsoe, who dealt with climate policy in the Clinton White House, says the Obama campaign has a whole new perspective on the issue compared with four years ago.

PAUL BLEDSOE: After talking about it a lot in 2008, as John McCain did, I think they have decided that the economy is such a paramount issue that it's better to talk about the economic side of clean energy, rather than the climate change side.

HARRIS: And indeed, we have heard a lot from the president about building a renewable energy industry in this country. Put in simple terms: clean energy, more jobs. But he has not been connecting the dots to global warming. Bledsoe says the issue has become a bit of a loser during the past four years.

BLEDSOE: Part of the president's reluctance to talk about climate change stems from the political mishandling of the issue in the first two years of his presidency. The White House made a decision to stick with a plan that they came up before the great economic recession, and it didn't go down well in Congress. A lot of people believe they should have trimmed their sails and taken half a loaf on climate change. And so, they feel they've been burned politically.

HARRIS: Cap-and-trade policies to address climate change by putting a price on carbon became a lightning rod for the Tea Party movement, and proved costly for some politicians in the 2010 election.

Mr. Obama has the environmental vote, whether he talks about climate change or not. So that's little incentive to raise the topic. But Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, says it could help the president attract some undecided voters, according to recent polling data.

ANTHONY LEISEROWITZ: Undecideds are much more like Obama voters when it comes to their belief in climate change, the causes of climate change, their desire for action by the president and Congress. They're almost identical to likely Obama voters.

HARRIS: And if those undecided voters are feeling put off by the relentless conversation about jobs, the economy, health care and the other top-tier issues, Leiserowitz says they might just respond with a pitch on climate change. But with the days ticking down to the election, there seems to be little inclination to introduce this potentially divisive issue into the conversation.

Richard Harris, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.