The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The middle of summer is when the surprises in publishing turn up. I'm talking about those quietly commanding books that publishers tend to put out now, because fall and winter are focused on big books by established authors. Which brings us to The Dream Life of Astronauts, by Patrick Ryan, a very funny and touching collection of nine short stories that take place in the 1960s and '70s around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

At least that's one premise of the Allen Brain Observatory, which launched Wednesday and lets anyone with an Internet connection study a mouse brain as it responds to visual information.

The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Pages

Sequestered Spring Means Fewer Rangers, Services At National Parks

Mar 5, 2013
Originally published on March 7, 2013 11:49 am

Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley, and the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget. Without a budget deal, the sequestration has forced the Park Service to cut a total of $134 million from sites around the country.

"Do we close a visitor center for the entire season, or do we just cut back hours?" says Yosemite spokesman Scott Gediman. "Do we trim ranger-led programs so there's less programs here in Yosemite Valley, or do we keep the same amount and either have less or none at the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias?"

All of these unanswered questions are weighing heavily on the minds of park managers, Gediman says. On a peak summer day, some 2,500 hikers pass through this forest just beneath the park's famed Half Dome.

The park has backcountry rangers who patrol the area, provide safety messages, orientation and check for fire rings that are improperly built, among other things, Gediman says, but the park is planning to cut almost all of its backcountry rangers.

They'll also hire fewer seasonal rangers and support staff. That means fewer people patrolling the trails and longer response times if there's an emergency.

"Right now, we're in a pattern where Yosemite National Park, like all national parks, we're having to make some real difficult decisions," he says.

Indeed, it's not just Yosemite feeling the squeeze. Picnic areas and campgrounds are expected to close in the Great Smoky Mountains; the visitor center at Cape Cod National Seashore probably won't open this summer, either.

Out West, at Glacier and Yellowstone, the Herculean task of snow plowing the scenic highways that crisscross the mountains could be delayed by almost a month.

"Visitors will still be able to enjoy national parks, they just won't have the same experience," says Joan Anzelmo, who spent much of her career at Yellowstone before joining the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees.

Anzelmo is also worried that delayed openings and cuts to park services will hurt the tourist-dependent towns outside the parks.

"I think as an American, it just makes you crazy that every few months, our government, the Congress, is taking us through these budget exercises that sometimes turn out to be games," Anzelmo says.

In the Yosemite Valley, a lot of visitors are saying the same thing.

"I think it's ridiculous; I think it's a joke," said park visitor Emelia Davern of New York, as she prepared for the long climb up the Upper Yosemite Falls Trail.

"Everyone's so headstrong right now, and it's so divided, but I think they don't see the impact that it actually has," she says.

Nearby, along the Merced River, Christine Nichols said she understands that the poor economy calls for belt-tightening. But she's not sure parks like this can afford to cut back anymore.

"Being in an environment like this, if you keep cutting back, eventually that directly impacts how safely people are going to be in nature," Nichols says. "It's not like you can just cut back and be more efficient when you're trying to cover a huge wild area."

And it's a huge wild area that sees on average 4 million visitors a year. But park officials are used to budget cuts, and they plan to lean on extra volunteers and more money from private groups to help them get through the summer.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

We're going to take a trip now to Yosemite, the land of huge granite domes like El Capitan to find out how some National Parks are handling sequestration. The Park Service has been told to cut $134 million in total.

And as NPR's Kirk Siegler found, in California, the fiscal axe is falling just as parks are gearing up for what could be another summer of record attendance.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley. And the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATERFALL)

SIEGLER: Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget.

SCOTT GEDIMAN: For example, do we close a visitor center for the entire season, do we just cut back hours? Do we trim ranger-led programs so there's less programs here in Yosemite Valley, or do we keep the same amount and either have less or none, for example, at the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias or up at Hech-Heche(ph)?

SIEGLER: All of these unanswered questions are weighing heavily on the minds of park managers, says Yosemite's spokesman Scott Gediman. He's standing at the start of the John Muir Trail. On a peak summer day, some 2,500 hikers pass through this forest just beneath the park's famed Half Dome.

GEDIMAN: Here for example at this trail, we have backcountry rangers that patrol the backcountry, provide safety messages, orientation, check for fire rings that are improperly built...

SIEGLER: But the park is planning to cut almost all of its backcountry rangers. They'll also hire fewer seasonal rangers and support staff. That means fewer people patrolling these trails and longer response times if there's an emergency.

GEDIMAN: Right now, we're in a pattern where, as Yosemite National Park, like all national parks, we're having to make some real difficult decisions.

SIEGLER: Indeed, it's not just Yosemite feeling the squeeze. Picnic areas and campgrounds are expected to close in the Great Smoky Mountains. The visitor center at Cape Cod National Seashore probably won't open this summer.

And out West, at Glacier and Yellowstone, the Herculean task of snow plowing the scenic highways that crisscross the mountains could be delayed by almost a month.

Joan Anzelmo spent much of her career at Yellowstone, before joining the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees.

JOAN ANZELMO: Visitors will still be able to still enjoy national parks, they just won't have the same experience.

SIEGLER: Anzelmo is also worried that delayed openings and cuts to park services will hurt the tourist dependent towns outside the parks.

ANZELMO: I think as an American, it just makes you crazy that every few months, our government, the Congress, is taking us through these budget exercises that sometimes turn into be games.

SIEGLER: In the Yosemite Valley, lots of visitors are saying the same thing.

EMELIA DAVERN: It's ridiculous. I think it's a joke.

SIEGLER: Emelia Davern of New York was bundled in a jacket and preparing for the long climb up the Upper Yosemite Falls Trail.

DAVERN: Everyone's so headstrong right now, and it's so divided, but I think they don't see the impact that it actually has.

(SOUNDBITE OF RIVER NOISES)

SIEGLER: Nearby, along the Merced River, Christine Nichols said she understands that the poor economy calls for belt-tightening. But she's not sure parks like this can afford to cut back anymore.

CHRISTINE NICHOLS: And being in an environment like this, if you keep cutting back, eventually that directly impacts how safe people are going to be in nature, you know, hiking around, getting stuck places, not knowing where you're going. It's not like you can just cut back and be more efficient when you're trying to cover a huge national, like, wild area.

SIEGLER: A huge wild area that sees, on average, four million visitors a year. But park officials are used to budget cuts and they plan to lean on extra volunteers and more money from private groups to help them get through the summer.

Kirk Siegler, NPR News, Yosemite National Park. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.