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The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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A Sensitive Raunchfest In 'The Inbetweeners'

Sep 6, 2012

Film adaptations of TV shows long off the air have proven hit-or-miss at the box office. But in recent years, the practice of continuing the story of a popular, recently concluded TV series in a feature film has made for easier business — even when the results are mixed creatively. There's a lot to get wrong in translating a successful series, and therefore a lot to consider: How much of an introduction will a wide audience need to a show's world and characters? How will the storytelling contend with the pacing and rhythms of a different medium? Can the movie offer a plot significant enough that it sustains interest for more than the usual half-hour or hour?

The Inbetweeners, a male-focused and self-conscious teen sex comedy based on the award-winning British TV series, answers the questions of adaptation with aplomb, dispensing a disposable but inventive and intelligent series follow-up which satisfies as a standalone experience.

Written by series creators Iain Morris and Damon Beesley and directed by Ben Palmer, who directed two of the three seasons of the show, the movie picks up the story of four not-quite-popular friends just as they're graduating from their public high school in the suburbs of London. Immediately, the 18 episodes exploring that world are one of the film's biggest assets, even for an audience unfamiliar with the show; the movie dispenses with clunky exposition and lets the audience catch up to characters through their actions.

As an appropriate introduction to the film's frequently bawdy and occasionally pessimistic tone, swaggering and sex-obsessed Jay (James Buckley) is caught half-naked by his mother and sister while doing something involving a hockey glove, a scuba mask, a credit card and lunch meat. They're there to tell him his grandfather has died. Things aren't going much better for earnest and oblivious Simon (Joe Thomas), who is summarily dumped by his girlfriend Carli (Emily Head) in preparation for the transition to university. Will (Simon Bird), the film's witty narrator and the group's most level-headed member, is also the most identifiably nerdy — it seems part of a crushing routine when he doles out sarcastic but hollow gibes as he's graced on the last day of school with one final wedgie from the school bully. The only one who seems to be getting along fine is Neil (Blake Harrison), but you get the sense that, even without a girlfriend, his sunny if slightly dim disposition would keep him happy.

Ready to relieve their academic and sexual frustrations, the guys take off for the teen summer holiday destination of Malia, Crete, which boasts beaches, clubs, alcohol and girls. Although their dank hostel seems minutes away from getting condemned, the group won't be deterred — especially Jay, who marshals Will, Neil and even heartsick Simon to make the best of the trip and have some sex.

Unlike many other R-rated comedies of recent years, The Inbetweeners is chiefly a sex comedy, though an unconventional one. While out having too much to drink, the guys (conveniently) meet four mostly available women, and they somewhat hit it off, each in their own awkward way. Will's self-deprecating humor charms Alison (Laura Haddock) in spite of her chiseled Greek boyfriend. In spite of his insecurities about seeming cool, and professing to be uninterested in flirting with someone of a bigger size, Jay develops an interest in similarly foul-mouthed Jane (Lydia Rose Bewley). Simon makes a fleeting connection with clearly interested Lucy (Tamla Kari) in the brief moment when he doesn't talk about his ex, who naturally turns up in Malia. And Neil — well, Neil gets along with just about anyone, including easygoing Lisa (Jessica Knappett).

To the film's credit, the role of women isn't typical of the genre. The Inbetweeners isn't trying to pass the Bechdel test, but its female characters are written sensitively and with more obvious maturity than the guys. And, while sex comedies traditionally traffic in male wish-fulfillment — and, with that, female nudity — that's not the case here. (In fact, there's plenty of male nudity.) Arriving at the sex comedy by way of the comedy of manners, the film playfully exploits male social and sexual anxieties as each guy makes a fool of himself in one way or another. Simon, trying to scrounge up enough money for a ticket to a boat party where he may see Carli, sells all his clothes (even the ones off his back), only to be grifted in the process.

Its raunchiness not withstanding, the most successful comedic bits in The Inbetweeners are character-driven, many of them as awkward as the teenage experiences they portray. The film even risks making its immature protagonists too awful to each other and the people they encounter to be sympathetic. Yet Jay, possibly the film's least likable character, turns out to be one of the most compelling; The Inbetweeners doesn't validate these guys' behavior, but instead places their actions in the context of insecurity and inexperience.

That grounded approach brings a level of realism to the film's few serious moments. In a remarkable display of directorial restraint, one guy's first experience of getting to second base plays out sweetly, nervously and in near silence. Even as The Inbetweeners revels in the guys' sexual failures, it treats their journeys as the significant experiences they are.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.