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Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Senators Get Time In Solitary Confinement

Jun 19, 2012
Originally published on June 19, 2012 6:59 pm

At any given moment, about 15,000 men and women are living in solitary confinement in the federal prison system, housed in tiny cells not much larger than a king-sized bed.

"It is hard to describe in words what such a small space begins to look like, feel like and smell like when someone is required to live virtually their entire life in it," says Craig Haney, a psychologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

But Tuesday, Haney, who has studied life inside prisons for three decades, had an opportunity to paint that picture.

Haney and other advocates had gathered in Washington to testify about solitary confinement to members of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on civil and human-rights issues. Committee members say they want to explore the costs of long-term isolation in U.S. prisons.

To help illustrate living conditions in solitary, committee members asked the architect's office in the U.S. Capitol to set up a replica of a cell — a tall white box with no windows — right inside the hearing room.

The replica provided the backdrop for what lawmakers called the first-ever congressional hearing on solitary confinement.

Lawsuits Pending

The sight was all too familiar for Anthony Graves. He lived for years on death row in Texas before he was exonerated in 2010.

"Solitary confinement, it breaks a man's will to live," Graves said. "He deteriorates right in front of your eyes."

Graves described how he saw inmates attempt suicide and cut themselves — and much worse. "There's a man right there, sittin' on Texas death row right now, who's housed in solitary confinement — pulled his eye out and swallowed it," Graves said.

Two lawsuits filed in recent weeks mention other disturbing behavior by inmates held in isolation.

One case focuses on California's Pelican Bay facility, where nearly 100 inmates have been held in isolation for 20 years. The Center for Constitutional Rights filed the federal suit on the prisoners' behalf.

The other case involves a so-called Supermax prison in Florence, Colo. Lawyers have sued the Federal Bureau of Prisons, charging that many of the 490 prisoners living in solitary there have severe mental problems and aren't getting the help they need.

Both lawsuits argue that solitary confinement violates the Eighth Amendment ban against cruel and unusual punishment.

At Tuesday's hearing, panel Chairman Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) pressed Charles Samuels, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, for his view.

"Do you believe that ... solitary confinement, 23 hours a day — five hours a week when you're allowed to leave that box or something that size — do you believe based on your life experience that's going to have an impact on an individual?" Durbin asked.

"I don't believe it's the preferred option," Samuels replied. But he said he must have someplace to put the most dangerous killers.

"We believe we have solitary confinement for the inmates who pose the most violence and disruption within the facility," he said. "We utilize it as a deterrent, to correct the behavior."

When pressed, Samuels reiterated that he feels solitary is an effective deterrent, but Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said he'd like to see more research on the issue.

Returning To Society

Lawmakers also heard from state officials, including Christopher Epps, commissioner of the Mississippi Department of Corrections.

Epps said people need to remember that most inmates — including those held in isolation — eventually get out.

"We realize that 95 percent of all the individuals ... incarcerated in Mississippi is coming back to our neighborhood, whether we like it or not," Epps said.

That's important, said Graves, because when those former inmates come back, they can bring what they learned in solitary with them.

"I had no physical contact with another human being for 10 of the 18 years I was incarcerated," Graves said. "Today I have hard time being around a group of people for long periods of time without feeling too crowded."

Graves says he survived his experience, but those 18 years were no way to live.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Washington, D.C., today, lawmakers held what they called the first ever congressional hearing on solitary confinement. Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee said they wanted to explore the costs of long-term isolation, and some of what they heard was disturbing. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: At any given moment in the federal prison system, about 15,000 men and women are living in solitary confinement in tiny cells not much bigger than a king-sized bed. Craig Haney is a psychologist who's studied life inside prisons for 30 years.

CRAIG HANEY: It is hard to describe in words what such a small space begins to look like, feel like and smell like when someone is required to live virtually their entire life in it.

JOHNSON: To make the point, senators asked the architect's office in the Capitol to put a replica of one of those cells - tall white box, no windows - right in the hearing room.

ANTHONY GRAVES: Solitary confinement, it breaks a man's will to live, and he deteriorates right in front of your eyes.

JOHNSON: The sight was all too familiar for Anthony Graves. Graves told lawmakers he lived for years on death row in Texas, before he was freed and ultimately exonerated in 2010. Graves said he saw inmates attempt suicide, cut themselves and then this horrible image.

GRAVES: There's a man right there sitting on Texas death row right now who's housed in solitary confinement, pulled his eye out and swallowed it.

JOHNSON: Two new lawsuits mention other disturbing behavior by inmates held in isolation. One case focuses on California's Pelican Bay facility, where nearly 100 inmates have been held in isolation for 20 years. The other is in Colorado, site of a federal supermax prison, where lawyers say many of the 490 prisoners living in solitary have severe mental problems. Both lawsuits argue solitary confinement violates the Eighth Amendment ban against cruel and unusual punishment. Panel chairman Richard Durbin, a Democrat from Illinois, pressed the director of the federal prison system for his view.

SENATOR RICHARD DURBIN: Do you believe that confinement, solitary confinement 23 hours a day, five hours a week when you're allowed to leave that box or something that size, do you believe based on your life experience in this business that that is going to have a negative impact on an individual?

CHARLES SAMUELS: Sir, I would say I don't believe it is the preferred option.

JOHNSON: But Charles Samuels, the leader of the overcrowded prison system, says he's got to have someplace to put the most dangerous inmates who have killed other people behind bars.

SAMUELS: We believe with solitary confinement for the inmates who pose the most violence and disruption within the facility that we utilize it as a deterrent to correct the behavior.

SENATOR LINDSEY GRAHAM: Do you think it works...

SAMUELS: Yes.

GRAHAM: ...as a deterrent?

JOHNSON: That was South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican, who says he'd like to see more research. Lawmakers also heard from state corrections officials like Christopher Epps of the Mississippi Department of Corrections. Epps says people need to remember most inmates, including the ones held in isolation, eventually get out.

CHRISTOPHER EPPS: We realize that 95 percent of all the individuals that's incarcerated in Mississippi is coming back to our neighborhood whether we like it or not.

JOHNSON: And when they come back, they can bring what they learned in solitary with them. Anthony Graves.

GRAVES: I had no physical contact with another human being for 10 of the 18 years I was incarcerated. Today, I have a hard time being around a group of people for long periods of time without feeling too crowded.

JOHNSON: Graves says he survived, but those 18 years were no way to live. Carrie Johnson, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.