NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Pages

In 'Season,' One Plantation's Double Murder Mystery

Sep 18, 2012
Originally published on September 22, 2012 6:35 am

When it comes to healing the wounds of its troubled racial past, the United States is still in its "adolescent phase," says novelist Attica Locke. The 2008 presidential election changed everything she had been taught about race, she says — and, as an African-American writer, she felt compelled to write about that new reality. The result is The Cutting Season, a thrilling, century-spanning story of two murders.

"I had moments when I was writing it where I was very afraid of offending people," Locke says, "because of some of the ways in which I think the book suggests that there's a script about race that we've been following for hundreds of years that doesn't really work anymore."

Locke tells NPR's Steve Inskeep about the inspiration for her new novel, and why she feels the past "walks with us still."


Interview Highlights

On setting her novel on a former Louisiana slave plantation by the Mississippi River

"This whole thing came to me because I went to a wedding at the Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, La., in 2004. And I had never been on a plantation before — probably, if I'm being frank, would never have gone on a plantation. We were bused in from New Orleans. And I don't think that I was psychologically prepared for that experience.

"You're driving through rural, working-class Louisiana poverty. And all of a sudden, along the Mississippi, this incredibly majestic house, these beautiful grounds with these arching oak trees, just kind of rises up. And I felt this tear inside — there's no way to not feel the beauty of it because it is so stunning. But it also kind of made my stomach turn, because of what it represented.

"And so the bus parked; all the guests in our, you know, finery disembark and get ready to go to this wedding. And I and my husband pause, and I started crying. I didn't understand what my presence there in 2004 meant. I was there with my white husband, it was an interracial couple getting married — I couldn't decide if the point of us being there was an act of healing, or if there was something sick about turning a plantation into an events venue — that you were stomping on the history, so to speak. And there's a way in which I do think that all of this is a metaphor for where we are as a country, where we're kind of caught between where we were and where we're going."

On the slave cabins she features on her fictional plantation

"At the time, Oak Alley did not have that. They had a big plaque that told you every slave that had ever been there and what that slave cost. But Oak Alley also has a gift shop, you can go get ice cream there, there's a restaurant, there's a bed and breakfast. So it was trying to have it both ways. And all of this stuff was playing in my mind when I sat down to write this book."

On how her novel's characters complicate notions of race and class

"One of the ironies of this book is that the woman who is running the plantation as a general manager, she's a black woman whose family — her mother used to be a cook there, and her ... roots go back to slavery on this plantation. But now, she has arrived, so to speak, as a general manager. She has an office in the big house. But now she's running a staff on this plantation that don't necessarily trust her, don't necessarily like her, and there's this kind of role reversal that I was playing with — and also wanting to say something about some of the complications about class ascendency when you're talking about it intraracially.

"I do think that for people of color — and also for women, frankly — that our economic ascent is always complicated by the fact that you're aware of people who aren't coming up with you. In the book, the lead character, Karen, has a Latina woman who works in ... her house, as her nanny. [Karen] can't do her job to run this company and put her kid through school and do all this unless this woman leaves her kids to work for Karen — which is a reversal of how things used to be when it was black women who were the domestics. But Karen understands that history and is undone by it, uncomfortable by it. She understands that this arriving in the big house doesn't really feel as great as she thought it would."

On her concerns about how the contentious relationship between two characters in her novel would be perceived

"There is something that I was worried about, which is the class difference between Karen and the character Donovan — this employee of hers, who's kind of a rabble-rouser, who's always trying to get the other staff to go against her. And they have an age difference and a class difference. And I worried that I was speaking, like, airing dirty laundry, so to speak, to discuss any kind of intraracial conflict. I do remember thinking, 'People aren't going to like Karen,' but then — it felt really honest to me that she and Donovan didn't necessarily have much in common even though they're of the same race. ...

"The problem is — and I go back to talking about economic uplift — that for somebody like Karen, her moving up in the world, and moving up to the big house ... she's not able to do that without having Donovan in the back of her head, whether she wants it or not. That's part of what it means to be a minority ... that when you carry all that history with you, as you're finding greater opportunities, you're also thinking that you're still connected to people who don't have those same opportunities.

"And am I supposed to be kicking my feet up in the big house, or what in the world am I supposed to be doing to help these other people come up? And that is a big complaint that people have about Obama. Plenty of black people feel like, 'OK, you've arrived in the big White House, the biggest White House of all. What are you doing for other black people?' "

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The novelist Attica Locke says race relations have changed in the last few years.

ATTICA LOCKE: I'm going to be frank very frank about something. In the summer of 2008, when it became very clear that Barack Obama was going to be the Democratic nominee, and frankly, to me, clear that this man was probably going to be president of the United States, I started having a series of panic attacks.

INSKEEP: Panic attacks because a huge national narrative was changing; a centuries-old narrative of African-Americans as disadvantaged, beaten down, oppressed. The mere possibility of a black president would modify the story Locke had known all her life. And that uneasiness drove her latest novel, "The Cutting Season."

LOCKE: I have moments when I was writing it where I was very afraid of offending people, because of some of the ways in which I think the book suggests that there is a script about race that we've been following for hundreds of years, that doesn't really work anymore.

INSKEEP: Despite her fears, "The Cutting Season" is out today. Attica Locke joined us in from member station KPCC.

So you write this novel, that in some ways is about politics in America, but it's about American society. And you set it on a former slave plantation by the Mississippi River in Louisiana. You've got a scene in which you have an employee, re-enactor as it were, at the plantation who is wearing an Obama '08 a T-shirt. At the same time, he's wearing the pants of his costume as Field Slave Number Two.

LOCKE: Yeah, that's kind of what I mean about we're at the halfway point. And this whole thing came to me because I went to a wedding at the Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, Louisiana, in 2004. And I had never been on a plantation before. Probably, if I'm being frank, would never have gone on a plantation. We were bused in from New Orleans. And I don't think that I was psychologically prepared for that experience.

You're driving through rural, working-class Louisiana poverty, and all of a sudden, along the Mississippi, this incredibly majestic house; these beautiful grounds with these arching oak trees, just kind of rises up. And I felt this tear inside. There's no way to not feel the beauty of it, because it is so stunning. But it also kind of made my stomach turn because of what it represented.

And so the bus parked; all the guests in our, you know, finery, disembarked and get ready to go to this wedding. And I and my husband pause, and I started crying. I didn't understand what my presence there in 2004 meant. I was there with my white husband, it was an interracial couple getting married.

I couldn't decide if the point of us being there was an act of healing, or if there was something sick about turning a plantation into an events venue - that you were stomping on the history, so to speak. And there's a way in which I do think that all of this is a metaphor for where we are as a country; where we're kind of caught between where we were and where we're going.

INSKEEP: Did the real-life plantation have slave cabins as your fictional plantation does?

LOCKE: At the time, Oak Alley did not have that. They had a big plaque that told you every slave that had ever been there and what that slave cost. But Oak Alley also has a gift shop, you can go get ice cream there, there's a restaurant, there's a bed and breakfast. So it was trying to have it both ways. And all of this stuff was playing in my mind when I sat down to write this book.

INSKEEP: And you end up creating some actors, re-enactors, who are playing slaves, who are kind of cranky as employees, it turns out.

LOCKE: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

LOCKE: Yes. And, you know, with one of the ironies of this book is that the woman who is running the plantation as a general manager, she's a black woman whose family - her mother used to be a cook there, and her roots go back to slavery on this plantation. But now, she has arrived, so to speak, as a general manager. She has an office in the big house.

But now she's running a staff on this plantation that don't necessarily trust her, don't necessarily like her. And there's this kind of role reversal that I was playing with, and also wanting to say something about some of the complications about class ascendency, when you're talking about it intra-racially. I do think that for people of color - and also for women, frankly - that our economic ascent is always complicated by the fact that you're aware of people who aren't coming up with you.

In the book, the lead character, Karen, has a Latina woman who works in her house, as her nanny. She can't do her job to run this company and put her kid through school and do all this, unless this woman leaves her kids to work for Karen; which is a reversal of how things used to be when it was black women who were the domestics.

But Karen understands that history and is undone by it, uncomfortable by it. She understands that this arriving in the big house doesn't really feel as great as I thought it would.

INSKEEP: As you were writing this novel, your second novel, was there a moment when you put something in and then, at least, considered taking it out, because it was just a little too dangerous?

LOCKE: There is something that I was worried about, which is the class difference between Karen and the character Donovan - this employee of hers, who's kind of a rabble-rouser, who's always trying to get the other staff to go against her. And they have an age difference and a class difference. And I worried that I was speaking, like, airing dirty laundry, so to speak, to discuss any kind of intra-racial conflict.

I do remember thinking people aren't going to like Karen. But then it felt really honest to me, that she and Donovan didn't necessarily have much in common, even though they're of the same race.

INSKEEP: I want to explain that a little further. There was a time, and maybe it's still true in some cases today, where many African-Americans feel that they're already in a disadvantaged position, already politically oppressed, and so they need to stick together and be unified. And maybe one of the things that you're suggesting, that you're proposing, is that things have changed enough that African-Americans can actually argue in the open.

LOCKE: Well, I mean I think that's honest. But the problem is - and I go back to talking about economic uplift - that for somebody like Karen, her moving up in the world and moving up to the big house, it doesn't - she's not able to do that without having Donovan in the back of her head, whether she wants it or not.

That's part of what it means to be a minority, so to speak, that when you carry all that history with you, as you're finding greater opportunities, you're also thinking that you're still connected to people who don't have those same opportunities. And am I supposed to be kicking my feet up in the big house, or what in the world am I supposed to be doing to help these other people come up?

And that is a big complaint that people have about Obama. Plenty of black people feel like, OK, you've arrived in the big White House, the biggest White House of all. What are you doing for other black people?

INSKEEP: You know, you made a reference to history again there. And I want to tell you that as I was reading this, I thought more than once of the old quotation from William Faulkner, saying that the past is not dead. In fact, it's not even past.

(LAUGHTER)

LOCKE: Yes. Yeah, it walks with us. It walks with us still.

INSKEEP: Attica Locke is author of "The Cutting Season." Thanks very much.

LOCKE: Oh, thank you so much.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.