Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Scientific Journals Plan To Publish Contentious Bird Flu Research

Mar 30, 2012
Originally published on March 30, 2012 6:12 pm

A government advisory committee has reconsidered its advice to keep certain details of bird flu experiments secret.

Revised versions of manuscripts that describe two recent studies can be openly published, the committee now says. The decision could help end a contentious debate that has raged within the scientific community for months.

In response, the editors of two journals immediately said they planned to publish the research soon.

The editor-in-chief of the journal Nature, Philip Campbell, said in an emailed statement that his journal was delighted at the news. "Subject to any outstanding regulatory or legal issues, we intend to proceed with publication as soon as possible," Campbell said.

The editor-in-chief of the journal Science, Bruce Alberts, said in a statement that his journal "will proceed in an expedient but careful manner" to publish the research in full.

Late last year, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity reviewed two papers describing experiments on bird flu and recommended that science journals not publish the full details. The concern was that the information could reveal how to create a contagious new form of the bird flu virus that could potentially be used as a bioweapon.

U.S. government officials accepted that assessment and began working to set up a secure system for sharing the sensitive information only with scientists who had a legitimate need to know. But officials quickly realized that thorny legal issues were going to make it very difficult to develop such a system for researchers all around the world.

Then, in February, a group convened by the World Health Organization called for full publication of the bird flu studies, saying that widely sharing the information was important for public health efforts to prepare for flu pandemics that might emerge in the future.

Government officials consequently asked the NSABB to take another look at revised versions of the manuscripts, plus additional information. In a two-day meeting that ended today, the panel of scientists and security experts heard from the researchers who did the work and also got a classified briefing from the intelligence community.

The NSABB now says "the data described in the revised manuscripts do not appear to provide information that would immediately enable misuse of the research in ways that would endanger public health or national security."

In addition, the committee cited new evidence that "underscores the fact that understanding specific mutations may improve international surveillance" to detect an emerging flu pandemic.

The vote was unanimous for one of the revised papers, from a group led by flu researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

But not everyone on the committee agreed about what to do with a study from the lab of Ron Fouchier of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. For that revised paper, the vote was 12 to 6 in favor of openly publishing the data, methods and conclusions.

The committee has no power to enforce its advice, but its views do carry weight. The flu researchers and science journals have voluntarily held off on publication since the NSABB gave its initial recommendations.

Meanwhile, the government is taking steps to try to prevent a controversy like this from arising in the future.

Yesterday officials released a new policy for overseeing biological research that could potentially be used to threaten the public. It calls for screening proposed and ongoing government-funded research projects that involve 15 particularly nasty pathogens and toxins, such as Ebola, anthrax and highly pathogenic bird flu.

If it appears that experiments could yield potentially dangerous information, officials will have to develop a plan to mitigate the risk that the work could be misused. In some cases, the work could be classified.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.