The new British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her cabinet today.

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The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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San Diego Mayor Faces More Calls To Resign

Jul 17, 2013
Originally published on July 17, 2013 8:11 pm

San Diego voters knew that Bob Filner could act like a jerk on occasion. But in 2012, they elected him mayor anyway.

Now, though, Filner's behavior may have crossed a threshold that few politicians can recover from.

The Democrat is facing numerous accusations of sexual harassment, and growing calls for him to step down from office.

At a press conference on Monday, attorneys Marco Gonzalez, Cory Briggs and former council member Donna Frye — all former Filner supporters — revealed the details of the allegations from three women who wish to remain anonymous.

According to statements from the women, one campaign volunteer said the mayor "[jammed] his tongue down her throat" and groped her; a constituent said that he kissed her and asked her on a date; a staffer said that he "grabbed her ass and touched her chest."

The women described a "Filner dance" they invented to avoid his advances and the "Filner headlock" he would put them in. According to Gonzalez, the mayor said things like, "They would do a better job on that floor if they worked without their panties on."

Just when it seemed it couldn't get worse, Filner's former fiancee, Bronwyn Ingram, came forward with the reasoning for their split after realizing an email she sent to one of Filner's security personnel would be released via a public records request.

"Bob's constant infidelities which are being flaunted in my face lately along with his abusiveness and disrespect has become absolutely intolerable," she wrote in the email.

In a statement to KPBS, Ingram asked him to resign. "Bob's behavior continued to become more aggressive; standard decorum seemed to disappear," she stated. "Bob recently began texting other women sexually explicit messages and setting up dates while in my presence and within my line of vision."

Ingram isn't the only one who thinks he should step down. So do several City Council members and local members of Congress. They're joined by the San Diego National Organization for Women.

And the results of a SurveyUSA poll from Friday say 59 percent of San Diego voters think the mayor should go.

In response to the initial allegations, Filner didn't deny any of the incidents. He released a video last week apologizing: "I've reached into my heart and soul and realized that I must and will change my behavior. ... I am also humble to admit that I need help. I have begun to work with professionals to make changes in my behavior and approach."

He has since hired an attorney, Harvey Berger, and made Walt Ekard interim chief operating officer.

Filner's abrasive personality has gotten him in trouble in the past. In 2007, an airport employee claimed in a criminal complaint that Filner, then a congressman, screamed at and pushed her. The House Ethics Committee ultimately dropped the investigation, although Filner had to pay $100 and send an apology letter. The incident became grist for an emotional 2012 attack ad by Filner's Republican opponent, Carl Demaio, which featured the airport employee recounting how she would "never forget he told me 'you can't stop me.' "

The San Diego County Democratic leadership, whose central committee is made up of around 60 members, will meet Thursday evening to determine an official response. Filner, who has refused to resign and insists he is innocent of sexual harassment, has been invited to attend.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.