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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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San Diego Mayor Ducks Out Early From Harassment Therapy

Aug 10, 2013
Originally published on August 12, 2013 10:14 am

San Diego's embattled Mayor Bob Filner is ending his two-week program of sexual harassment therapy — a week early, according to his lawyers.

Filner, 70, has resisted calls for his resignation after acknowledging that he behaved inappropriately toward women over the years.

He will take "some personal time" and be unavailable for comment, according to a statement by the law firm Payne & Fears, which is assisting Filner in his defense against accusations from more than a dozen women. The statement said the mayor would continue treatment on an outpatient basis. Earlier, Filner had said he would be in therapy until Aug. 19.

The announcement comes as all nine city council members have joined in a bipartisan call for Filner, a Democrat, to resign.

On Friday, U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer wrote a "Dear Bob" letter to add her voice to those calling for resignation, according to The Los Angeles Times:

"Bob, you have already hurt so many people," the fellow Democrat wrote. "To avoid hurting your victims and the people of San Diego more than you already have, you should step down immediately."

By way of background, the Times writes:

"Some 14 women have accused Filner of making unwanted and unpleasant sexual advances. One, former communications director Irene McCormack Jackson, has filed a sexual harassment lawsuit in San Diego County Superior Court seeking unspecified damages.

"The accusations of the other 13 share a similar scenario: that they met Filner at a public event or while asking for his help on a public issue and that he made sexually inappropriate comments, asked them for dates, and, in some cases, kissed or touched them.

"Among the 13 are prominent businesswomen, a retired Navy admiral, a political consultant, two college officials, a nurse seeking help for a wounded Marine and a longtime city employee."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.