Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Russian Accuses Voice Of America Of Fake Interview

Feb 20, 2012
Originally published on February 20, 2012 6:56 am

NPR's Michele Kelemen is a former employee of Voice of America.

Russian anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny has been the victim of many dirty tricks by pro-Kremlin media.

But when the U.S. government-funded Voice of America published an online interview that had him criticizing other Russian opposition figures, Navalny quickly tweeted that the interview was a fake.

"It seems the VOA has gone nuts," he wrote to his Twitter followers.

VOA director David Ensor apologized for the incident and said the Russian service has tightened its procedures.

"But you know in the digital age, it is increasingly difficult sometimes to know who it is you are in contact with," he says. "And in Russia, there are a number of entities — including some connected with the Kremlin — that make a business of trying to confuse the image of people like Mr. Navalny, by impersonating him and doing various things. So we may have been scammed, but we may never know for sure."

Navalny wouldn't comment for this story. Ensor says VOA journalists have made their peace with him.

"One of our stringers reached Mr. Navalny at a demonstration and said, 'Look, we are really sorry if we got it wrong. Did we get it wrong?' " Ensor says. "And he said, 'Hey don't mention it; don't worry about it; there's a lot of stuff going on around here.' "

But others don't see this as an isolated incident. Former VOA employee Ted Lipien says the Russian service now relies on contractors, who aren't familiar with American journalistic values.

"And I'm not saying that one should not hire people with fresh knowledge of countries like Russia," Lipien says. "But if you are the Voice of America, you also need seasoned editors with other experience — American experience."

In one webcast, for instance, the VOA host hardly pushes back in a lengthy interview with a pro-Putin youth leader, who complains that the U.S. is trying to foment revolution in his country.

Ensor says journalists are just trying to be balanced and credible

"You are going to hear people who are sympathetic to [Russian Prime Minister Vladimir] Putin; you are going to hear, for sure, people who are not sympathetic to Putin," he says. "Is the mix right on every single show? Maybe not. And that's probably also true at National Public Radio."

Outside reviews of VOA's Russian service have raised concerns. A Senate staffer familiar with them says the reviews mostly call on VOA to provide more coverage of corruption and human rights. But the staffer says there is "no smoking gun" to indicate a deliberate pro-Putin bias.

There's another problem, says Lipien, who co-founded the Committee for U.S. International Broadcasting.

"Russian service has no radio or television programs, so their audience in Russia is minuscule because of that," he says.

VOA says it's getting more hits than ever on its website and has a growing Twitter following of 30,000. It's also starting an interactive social media show, despite its shrinking budget.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Russia has also been investing heavily in media aimed at foreigners. Americans curious about Kremlin policy on Syria can check out the cable channel Russia Today. The U.S.-government-funded Voice of America, on the other hand, took is Russian service off the air. It now exists only as a website. NPR's Michele Kelemen, who herself once worked for the VOA, reports that website recently fell victim to Kremlin tricks.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Russian anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny has been the victim of many dirty tricks by pro-Kremlin media. But when the Voice of America published an online interview that had him criticizing other Russian opposition figures, Navalny quickly tweeted that the interview was a fake. It seems the VOA has gone nuts, he wrote to his Twitter followers. VOA director David Ensor apologized and said the Russian service has tightened its procedures.

DAVID ENSOR: But you know, in the digital age, it is increasingly difficult sometimes to know who it is you are in contact with. And in Russia, there are a number of entities - including some connected with the Kremlin - that make a business out of trying to confuse the image of people like Mr. Navalny by impersonating him doing various things. So it looks like we may have been scammed, but we may never know for sure.

KELEMEN: Navalny wouldn't comment for this story. Ensor says VOA journalists have made their peace with him.

ENSOR: One of our stringers reached Mr. Navalny at a demonstration and said, look. We're really sorry if we got it wrong. Did we get it wrong? And he said, hey, don't mention it. Don't worry about it. There's a lot of stuff going on around here.

KELEMEN: But others don't see this as an isolated incident. Ted Lipien, a former VOA employee, says the Russian service relies now on contractors who aren't familiar with American journalistic values.

TED LIPIEN: And I'm not saying that one should not hire people with fresh knowledge of countries like Russia, but if you are the Voice of America, you also need seasoned editors with other experience, American experience.

(SOUNDBITE OF WEBCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Russian spoken)

KELEMEN: In this webcast, for instance, the VOA host hardly pushes back in a lengthy interview with a pro-Putin youth leader who complains that the U.S. is trying to foment revolution in his country.

(SOUNDBITE OF WEBCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Russian spoken)

KELEMEN: VOA Director Ensor says journalists are just trying to be balanced and credible.

ENSOR: You're going to hear people on there that are sympathetic to Putin. You're going to hear, for sure, people who are not sympathetic to Putin. Is the mix right on every single show? Maybe not, and that's probably also true at National Public Radio.

KELEMEN: Outside reviews of VOA's Russian service have raised concerns. A Senate staffer familiar with them said the reviews mostly call on VOA to provide more coverage of corruption and human rights, but the staffer says there is, quote, "no smoking gun to indicate a deliberate pro-Putin bias." There is another problem, says Ted Lipien, who cofounded the Committee for U.S. International Broadcasting.

LIPIEN: Voice of America Russian service has no radio or television programs, so their audience in Russia is miniscule because of that.

KELEMEN: VOA says it's getting more hits than ever on its website and has a growing Twitter following of 30,000. It's also starting an interactive social media show, despite a shrinking budget. Michelle Kelemen, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.