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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Runner Has Eyes On Two Prizes: Olympics, Ph.D.

Jun 20, 2012
Originally published on June 20, 2012 8:30 am

Among the dozens of athletes hoping to leap, throw or run their way to London as part of the U.S. track and field team is 24-year-old runner Shannon Leinert.

Leinert, who will compete in the 800-meter dash, has dreamed of the Olympics since she was 10 and winning races in St. Louis, her hometown. If that weren't enough, she's also working on a doctoral degree in special education.

Leinert now trains at the University of Missouri-Columbia track that revived her college career and allowed her to think seriously about the Olympics. It was also on this campus that she fell in love with special-needs students and decided to try to earn a doctoral degree.

Leinert then chose to tackle training and studying at the same time.

"At the beginning ... it was such an easy decision," Leinert says, "because I felt like school and running is a great complement for each other."

Dan Quigley, Leinert's boyfriend and sometime training partner, wasn't alone in thinking that probably wasn't the best idea.

"I've continually challenged her to lighten her load a little bit in terms of school so she can be more competitive," Quigley says. "I see this as a kind of once or twice in a lifetime opportunity, but she continues to challenge herself both in school and off the track. She never backs down from anything."

Leinert appears to be the ultimate multitasker, but she acknowledges that it took time to adjust to the demands placed on her by the high level of both academics and athletics.

"I think my running suffered a lot," she says. "Then this year, I'd say I've been a little more selfish with my running, and I'll close my laptop around 11:30 and just go to bed."

Fred Binggeli, who coached the 1988 Olympic champion in the men's 800 meters, has worked with Leinert for the past two years. He says once everything clicked for her, the difference was night and day.

"You saw a happy person; you saw a positive person," Binggeli says. "She only had one two-week period during the whole year that she seemed like she wasn't going to be able to handle everything; she was able to fight through that and get better and better and better."

That ability doesn't surprise Leinert's college coach, Rebecca Wilmes, who says for athletes in Leinert's situation, there's a lot of soul-searching.

"She had to go through it and get to the other side, still rolling and loving it," Wilmes says. "Things come together for her. It's a pattern."

Leinert is definitely rolling. When the outdoor track season started in March, she was completing the two laps of an 800-meter race in 2 minutes, 7 seconds. Earlier this month, her time was down to just a hair over 2 minutes.

She'll need to be even faster, though, to get to London: just under 2 minutes. Does she think she can do it?

"Yeah, I do. Especially after my workout the other day, I really would not be surprised this time if I went under 2 [minutes]," she says.

Binggeli is just as confident. He says it's nice to see Leinert end on a high note after struggling.

"If nothing else, she's going to come out with a personal best timewise," he says. "She's still young enough that if she doesn't make this Olympic team, you need to look four more years down the road."

The 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro are already on Leinert's mind. On her agenda before that: defending her dissertation next year.

The U.S. Olympic trials in track and field begin Thursday in Eugene, Ore.

Copyright 2013 KWMU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.stlpublicradio.org.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The U.S. Olympic trials in track and field begin tomorrow in Eugene, Oregon. Among the dozens of athletes hoping to leap, throw or run their way to London is Shannon Leinert, who will compete in the 800-meter dash. Leinert's been dreaming of the Olympics since she was a 10-year-old winning races in St. Louis. But that is not the only difficult goal she's currently pursuing.

St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann has this profile.

RACHEL LIPPMAN, BYLINE: It's a hot, windy spring day on the campus of the University of Missouri-Columbia, but that doesn't keep Shannon Leinert from her training. Leinert, 24, is beating the heat in pink shorts and a black sports bra. Her long brown hair whips her face as she sprints around a red cinder track, neon blue and green spikes pounding.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Shannon.

LIPPMAN: It was on this track that Leinert revived her college career, which allowed her to think seriously about the Olympics. But it was at this school that she fell in love with special-needs students and decided to try to earn a Ph.D. in special education. She then chose to tackle training and studying at the same time.

SHANNON LEINERT: At the beginning, yes, it was such an easy decision because I felt like school and running is a great complement for each other.

LIPPMAN: Her boyfriend and sometime training partner, Dan Quigley, wasn't alone in thinking that probably wasn't the best idea.

DAN QUIGLEY: I've continually challenged her to lighten her load a little bit in terms of school so that she can be more competitive, just because I see this as, you know, a kind of maybe once or twice in a lifetime opportunity. And she continues to challenge herself really hard both in school and on the track. You know, she never backs down from anything.

LIPPMAN: Leinert appears to be the ultimate multi-tasker, but admits it took time to adjust to the demands placed on her by the high level of both academics and athletics.

LEINERT: I think my running suffered a lot. And then this year I'd say I've been a little more selfish with my running. And I'll close my laptop around like 11:30 and just go to bed.

LIPPMAN: Fred Binggeli coached the 1988 Olympic champion in the men's 800 race and has worked with Leinert for the past two years. He says once everything started clicking for her, the difference was night and day.

FRED BINGGELI: You saw a happy person. You saw a positive person. She only had about one two-week period during the whole year that she seemed like she wasn't going to be able to handle everything. And she was able to fight through that and really just get better and better and better.

LIPPMAN: That ability doesn't surprise Leinert's college coach, Rebecca Wilmes.

REBECCA WILMES: There's a lot of soul-searching, I think, an athlete in that situation does. And yeah, she had to go through it and get to the other side, still rolling and loving it. Things come together for her. It's a pattern.

LIPPMAN: And Leinert's definitely rolling. When the outdoor track season started in March, she was completing the two laps of an 800 in two minutes, seven seconds. Earlier this month, her time was down to a hair over two minutes. She'll need to be even faster, though, to get to London.

LEINERT: One fifty-eight to 159.

LIPPMAN: Do you think you can do it?

LEINERT: Yeah, I do. And especially after my workout the other day, I would not be surprised this time if I actually went under two.

LIPPMAN: Fred Binggeli is just as confident. And he says it's nice to see Shannon end on a high note after struggling.

BINGGELI: If nothing else, she's going to come out with a personal best time-wise. And she's still young enough, if she doesn't make this Olympic team, you need to look four more years down the road.

LIPPMAN: The 2016 games in Rio are already on Shannon Leinert's mind. On her agenda before that: defending her dissertation next year.

For NPR News, I'm Rachel Lippmann in St. Louis. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.