"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Rio+20 Summit Sustains Little More Than Sentiment

Jun 23, 2012
Originally published on June 23, 2012 11:15 pm

The Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development was the biggest United Nations conference ever, but it may be one of the biggest duds. It produced no major agreements — just a vaguely worded declaration that has been widely derided.

More than 45,000 people registered for the event in Rio de Janeiro, but diplomats couldn't even agree about the meeting's objective until 2:45 a.m. on Tuesday, just before heads of state and other high-level delegates started arriving in Rio.

They finally agreed to a long-winded declaration about alleviating poverty and leaving the planet livable for future generations. It was more platitudes than anything else, which sparked anger and disappointment.

Friday, on the final day of the conference, former Costa Rican president Jose Maria Figueres didn't even try to hide his contempt as he addressed the conference's secretary general, Sha Zukang, at a news conference.

"One thousand five hundred CEOs from 60 nations, global NGOs from all over the world, have come to your conference and committed to action," he said. "Those who have failed you, Mr. Sha, are the governments. Those are the ones that have failed you, sir."

Actually, conference organizer Sha replied, he did not intend to defend the conclusions. There were simply too many competing interests. It's not his job to make people happy.

"My job was to make everybody equally unhappy. If one party's happy ... then others are not happy. ... So equally unhappy means equally happy," he said.

Obviously, there is no consensus about what path the world needs to take to pull billions of people out of poverty in a manner that will sustain the environment and leave resources for future generations.

Sha, who is about to retire from his career at the U.N., then asked, what good are big promises, anyway? He pointed specifically to the ambitious pledges made at the big U.N. climate meeting in Copenhagen two years ago.

"Nobody forced you to make commitments. By why comply with the commitments? It's voluntary, but you're voluntarily lying to the people because you're not honoring them," Sha said.

Clearly, the meeting in Rio has raised some existential questions for the United Nations. Achim Steiner, who heads the UN Environment Program, pins lot of the difficulty on a new political landscape.

"Here in Rio 2012, despite, in a sense, the impression that this is still a debate between North and South, between rich and poor, between those who have natural resources and those who don't — in fact, the world is much more complex," he said.

There's the economic turmoil in Europe and the political divide in the United States. But also, emerging economies like China and India are suddenly big players still trying to balance economic development, the environment and social issues.

So did any good come from Rio+20? Manish Bapna, acting president of the World Resources Institute, says at least the world has agreed to work on a new set of goals to promote sustainable development.

"The next two, three years will be quite a bit of work in trying to define what they are, what they mean, how they can be achieved," he says. "But I think that could be an important outcome that emerges from Rio+20."

While that may sound like more just talk, the reality is that collective goals — like combating climate change, preserving the oceans and alleviating hunger and poverty — do require collective action and therefore consensus. The problem, of course, is that talk doesn't keep pace with the rapidly changing conditions on our planet.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development, which ended yesterday, was the biggest United Nations conference ever. More than 45,000 people registered for the event in Rio de Janeiro. It may be one of the biggest duds. It produced no major agreements, just a vaguely worded declaration that's been widely derided. NPR's Richard Harris reports.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: Diplomats couldn't even agree about the meeting's objective until 2:45 A.M. on Tuesday, just before heads of state and other high-level delegates started arriving in Rio. They finally agreed to a long-winded declaration about alleviating poverty and leaving the planet livable for future generations. It was more platitudes than anything else, and that sparked anger and disappointment. Friday, on the final day of the conference, former Costa Rican President Jose Maria Figueres didn't even try to hide his contempt as he addressed the conference's secretary general at a news conference.

JOSE MARIA FIGUERES: A thousand five hundred CEOs from 60 nations, global NGOs from all over the world have come to your conference and committed to action. Those who have failed you, Mr. Sha, are the governments. Those are the ones that have failed you, sir.

HARRIS: Actually, conference organizer Sha Zukang replied, he did not intend to defend the conclusions. There were simply too many competing interests, and it's not his job to make people happy.

SHA ZUKANG: Our job is to make everybody equally unhappy. If one party is happy, one group is happy, then other's not happy. No, you won't have it. So, equally unhappy means equally happy.

HARRIS: Obviously, there is no consensus about what path the world needs to take to pull billions of people out of poverty in a manner that will sustain the environment and leave resources for future generations. And Sha, who is about to retire from his career at the U.N., then asked what good are big promises, anyway? He pointed specifically to the ambitious pledges made at the big U.N. climate meeting in Copenhagen two years ago.

ZUKANG: Nobody forced you to make the make the commitments, but why don't you comply your commitments. It's voluntary but you have one in three lying to the people, because you're not honoring them.

HARRIS: Clearly, the meeting in Rio has raised some existential questions for the United Nations. Achim Steiner, who heads the U.N. Environment Program, pins lot of the difficulty on a new political landscape.

ACHIM STEINER: Here in Rio 2012, despite, in a sense, the impression that this is still a debate between north and south, between rich and poor, between those who natural resources and those who don't. In fact, the world is much more complex.

HARRIS: There's the economic turmoil in Europe and the political divide in the United States. But also, emerging economies like China and India are suddenly big players still trying to balance economic development, the environment and social issues. So, did any good come from Rio+20? Manish Bapna, acting president of the World Resources Institute, says at least the world has agreed to work on a new set of goals to promote sustainable development.

MANISH BAPNA: The next two, three years will be quite a bit of work in trying to define what they are, what they mean, how they can be achieved. But I think that could be an important outcome that emerges from Rio+20.

HARRIS: And while that may sound like more just talk, the reality is that collective goals, like combating climate change, preserving the oceans, and alleviating hunger, do require collective action, and therefore, consensus. The problem, of course, is that talk doesn't keep pace with the rapidly changing conditions on our planet. Richard Harris, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.