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"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Pages

A Return To 'Safety First' For Michigan Nuclear Plant

Apr 22, 2012
Originally published on April 22, 2012 10:23 pm

The Palisades nuclear power plant in Michigan had five unplanned shutdowns last year. It's one of the area's biggest employers, and its safety record is one of the worst in the country. Now it's trying to prove to federal regulators that it can meet their standards.

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the Palisades Power Plant is tucked in between tall sand dunes in Covert Township, Mich., at the southern edge of Van Buren State Park.

Kathy Wagaman, who heads the chamber of commerce in South Haven, 7 miles north of Palisades, said she remembers spending summer days at the state park, playing football, swimming and sailing with no real concerns about the plant.

"Back in the '80s and early '90s — actually, up until 9/11 — we all used to swim in front of it because the water was warm," she said.

Wagaman said the nuclear plant is one of the largest employers in Van Buren County, with about 700 workers on any given day. In fact, the Palisades plant is the county's largest taxpayer.

"They've been a very good neighbor," she said, "and I just feel confident that they're taking good care of this."

The "this" Wagaman refers to is a series of safety problems at the plant last year. Palisades unexpectedly shut down five different times, and during four of those shutdowns, the nuclear reactor stopped.

Federal regulators say such unexpected shutdowns are not common. There are more than 100 nuclear power plants in the U.S., and the plant's owner, Entergy Nuclear, owns 10 others. Palisades is one of only four plants in the U.S. with such a bad safety rating.

That poor record scares Maynard Kaufman, who lives with his wife on a small farm 11 miles inland.

"If you just have one accident, and [even] if it were only one in a million, it is a cost that we don't want to have to bear," he said.

Kaufman feels so strongly about the risks of nuclear power that he rebuilt his home. It now relies entirely on wind and solar power. It's a good feeling, he said, to know that none of his energy comes from the Palisades plant.

'Were There Mistakes Made? Yes ...'

The plant's atmosphere has changed over the past few years; there's a renewed focus on safety. There are three security checkpoints before an employee can reach the control room. Once there, it's nearly silent — so that the five or six operators can concentrate.

"Everything is done by procedure," said Palisades spokesman Mark Savage. "There's nothing that we do here that says, 'Oh, I'm going to turn this knob.' It has to have a procedure by it."

But one night last September, a worker did not follow the procedure after getting permission from a supervisor. As a result, an electrical circuit shorted out, and the control room lost power to half its indicators. That incident was the most significant safety violation at Palisades last year.

"Were there mistakes made? Yes, there were," Savage said. "And those have been corrected."

No one was fired because of September's incident. Savage said the main cause of all the safety violations last year was human error, and that the plant is well on its way to fixing that particular issue.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission oversees the inspection teams at Palisades, and its threshold is low for mistakes at nuclear plants.

"Although I think there's concerns warranted — I'm concerned — I mean, we've concluded that the plant's operating safely," said Jack Geisner, who leads inspection teams through the Palisades plant.

Geisner's inspection teams will spend thousands of man-hours at the plant this year and beyond — however long it takes for Entergy to prove that the safety culture at Palisades is up to federal regulators' standards.

Copyright 2014 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit http://michiganradio.org/.

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

The Palisades nuclear power plant on the shores of Lake Michigan has one of the worst safety ratings in the country. The plant had five unplanned shutdowns last year. This year, as Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports, federal regulators are keeping an even closer eye on the facility.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER RUNNING)

LINDSEY SMITH, BYLINE: The Palisades nuclear power plant is tucked in between tall sand dunes at the southern edge of Van Buren State Park in Covert Township. Kathy Wagaman remembers spending a ton of time on the beach at the state park, playing football, swimming, sailing with no real regard for the nuclear plant.

KATHY WAGAMAN: I know that back in the '80s and early '90s - oh, actually, up until 9/11 - we all used to swim out in front of it because the water was warm.

SMITH: Wagaman now heads the South Haven Area Chamber of Commerce. South Haven is a small tourist city seven miles north of Palisades. Wagaman says the nuclear plant is one of the largest employers in Van Buren County. About 700 people work at the plant every day, and it is the county's largest taxpayer.

WAGAMAN: They've been a very good neighbor, and I just feel confident that they're taking good care of this.

SMITH: This is a series of safety problems at the plant last year. The nuclear reactor at Palisades stopped four out of the five times the plant shut down unexpectedly. Entergy Nuclear Operations owns Palisades and 10 other nuclear plants in the United States. Federal regulators say the unexpected shutdowns at Palisades are not common.

There are just over 100 nuclear power plants in the U.S. - Palisades is one of only four with such a bad safety rating. That scares Maynard Kaufman. He and his wife live on a small farm 11 miles inland.

MAYNARD KAUFMAN: If you just have one accident, and if it were only one in a million, it is a cost that we don't want to have to bear.

SMITH: Kaufman feels so strongly he rebuilt his home so that it relies on wind and solar power. It gives him a good feeling knowing none of his energy is coming from the Palisades plant.

After three security checkpoints, Palisades spokesman Mark Savage takes me into the plant's control room. It's quiet so the five or six operators can concentrate.

MARK SAVAGE: Everything is done by procedure. There's nothing that we do here that says, oh, I'm going to turn this knob. It has to have a procedure by it.

SMITH: But one night last September, a worker did not follow procedures. In fact, the worker got permission from a supervisor to do so. During the work, an electrical circuit shorted out, and the control room lost half its indicators. That was the most significant safety violation at Palisades last year.

SAVAGE: Were there mistakes made? Yes, there were. And those have been corrected.

SMITH: No one was fired because of the incident. Savage says the main cause of all the safety violations last year, human error, has already declined this year. Jack Geisner is with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He oversees the inspection teams at Palisades. Geisner points out the NRC has a really low threshold for mistakes at nuclear plants.

JACK GEISNER: So although, I think, there's concerns warranted - I'm concerned - I mean, we've concluded that the plant's operating safely.

SMITH: Geisner says his inspection teams will spend thousands of man-hours at the plant this year and beyond until Entergy can prove the safety culture at Palisades is up to federal regulators' standards. For NPR News, I'm Lindsey Smith in South Haven, Michigan. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.