Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Retired General Defends Himself Amid Leak Reports

Jun 28, 2013

Retired Marine Gen. James "Hoss" Cartwright, the former vice chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff who has reportedly been named as a target of a federal leak investigation, has issued a statement defending himself, saying that he did not betray the United States.

As The Two-Way reported last night, Cartwright has reportedly been named as "the target of a Justice Department investigation" into how reporters learned details about the United States' role in the sabotage of an Iranian nuclear facility by a computer virus in 2010.

Here's a short statement released by Cartwright's attorney, Gregory Craig, Friday:

"General Jim Cartwright is an American hero who served his country with distinction for four decades. Any suggestion that he could have betrayed the country he loves is preposterous."

Even as far back as 2011, the United States was seen as the "leading force" behind the Stuxnet project, as NPR's Tom Gjelten reported, citing a German cybersecurity expert.

But in June of 2012, The New York Times solidified that view, and reported on the decisions that had led up to Stuxnet's deployment, including private conversations among President Obama and his national security team. It also described Stuxnet as just one element of a larger program, code-named Olympic Games.

Calling the relaying of details about Stuxnet "a politically sensitive leak of classified information," NBC's Michael Isikoff reported last night that sources have told him that Cartwright, who was the second-ranking officer in America's military at the time of Stuxnet, was the target of investigators looking into the leak that provided details for the Times story.

The Times article mentions Cartwright twice, saying that he "had established a small cyberoperation inside the United States Strategic Command," and calling him a crucial player in the Olympic Games project. The story also gave new details about how the bug had been developed by the United States, working with Israel.

After that story was published, Attorney General Eric Holder ordered an investigation into the leak. And this past January, The Washington Post reported that the FBI and prosecutors had spoken to "several current and former senior government officials in connection with the disclosures, sometimes confronting them with evidence of contact with journalists, according to people familiar with the probe."

The Post also quoted a source as saying the investigators were looking at "everybody — at pretty high levels, too."

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