New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Report: Spy Agencies' 'Black Budget' Reveals Intelligence Gaps

Aug 29, 2013

The Washington Post on Thursday reports on U.S. spy agencies' $52.6 billion secret budget for fiscal year 2013, a document that reveals significant "blind spots" obscuring the intentions and motives of U.S. friends and foes alike.

In the first of a package of stories expected out Thursday, the newspaper says that the 'black budget' blueprint, obtained from former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, "maps a bureaucratic and operational landscape" that "details the successes, failures and objectives of 16 spy agencies", including the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, the FBI and others.

It's a laundry list of "known unknowns" that reveal some of the strategic thinking and concerns of U.S. intelligence agencies and policymakers. Here are some highlights from the report:

-- The CIA's $14.7 billion budget is roughly twice that of the NSA.

-- The NSA planned to investigate 4,000 possible "insider" threats in 2013 in which one of its own was suspected of compromising sensitive information.

-- Pakistan is described as an "intractable target" and counterintelligence operations "are strategically focused against [the] priority targets of China, Russia, Iran, Cuba and Israel."

-- In 2011, the budget assessment says some progress had been made on 38 of 50 "blind spots" ranging from knowledge of the workings of Lebanon's Hezbollah movement to the security of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal, the capabilities of China's next-generation fighter jet and how the Russian leadership might react "to potentially destabilizing events in Moscow, such as large protests and terrorist attacks."

According to the Post:

"The documents describe expanded efforts to "collect on Russian chemical warfare countermeasures" and assess the security of biological and chemical laboratories in Pakistan.

View select pages from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's top-secret 2013 budget with key sections annotated by The Washington Post.

A table of "critical" gaps listed five for North Korea, more than for any other country that has or is pursuing a nuclear bomb.

The intelligence community seems particularly daunted by the emergence of "home grown" terrorists who plan attacks in the United States without direct support or instruction from abroad, a threat realized this year, after the budget was submitted, in twin bombings at the Boston Marathon."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.