Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Report Slams Sen. Stevens' Prosecutors

Mar 15, 2012
Originally published on March 15, 2012 10:34 am

In a "blistering" 500-page report released this morning a special prosecutor concludes that Justice Department lawyers "intentionally withheld" information that could have bolstered then-Sen. Ted Stevens' defense during the Alaska Republican's 2008 trial on corruption charges, NPR's Carrie Johnson tells us.

She adds that Special Prosecutor Henry Schuelke says the case against Stevens was infected by the failure to turn over evidence that could have helped him damage the credibility of the government's key witness.

Stevens, as Carrie has previously reported for us:

"Was convicted of making false statements and related charges after a five-week trial in 2008. While Stevens was appealing the decision, U.S. Attorney Gen. Eric Holder took the extraordinary step of abandoning the case a year later, after evidence surfaced that the Justice Department team withheld documents from Stevens' defense that would have helped the former lawmaker poke holes in the account of the key witness against him."

Among the critical information that prosecutors didn't share with Stevens' attorneys:

-- Witness Rocky Williams was willing to testify that he "had the same understanding and belief as Senator Stevens and his wife" that the senator had indeed paid for renovation work done on one of his homes.

-- Witness Bill Allen, who allegedly had given "benefits and others things of value" to Stevens connected to the renovation work, provided "significant exculpatory information" about Stevens to prosecutors.

In a statement today, the law firm that represented Stevens (Williams & Connolly LLP) says the report shows that "corrupt prosecutors obtained an illegal verdict against Sen. Stevens on October 27, 2008. As a result, a sitting senator lost certain re-election and the balance of power shifted in theUnited States Senate."

The special prosecutor says, however, that "although the evidence establishes that this misconduct was intentional, the evidence is insufficient to establish beyond a reasonable doubt" that prosecutors violated federal law, "which requires the intentional violation of a clear and unambiguous [judge's] order."

Stevens and four others died in the August 2010 crash of a small plane while they were on a fishing trip in Alaska. He was 86.

As Carrie tells our Newscast Desk, the government's actions during the Stevens case have "led to calls for new laws and federal rules to govern prosecutors' conduct."

Update at 10:35 a.m. ET. Justice Department Says "One Failure Is One Too Many":

Laura Sweeney, a Justice Department spokeswoman has emailed this statement to reporters:

"The department has cooperated fully with Mr. Schuelke's inquiry into the prosecution of former Sen. Ted Stevens and provided information throughout the process. The department is in the process of making an independent assessment of the conduct and, to the extent it is appropriate and in accordance with the privacy laws, we will endeavor to make our findings public when that review is final.

"When concerns were raised about the handling of this case following the 2008 conviction of Sen. Stevens, the department conducted an internal review that culminated in the attorney general ordering a dismissal of this case. Since that dismissal in April 2009, the department has instituted a sweeping training curriculum for all federal prosecutors, and made annual discovery training mandatory. We have taken unprecedented steps to ensure prosecutors, agents and paralegals have the necessary training and resources to properly fulfill their discovery and ethics obligations.

"We know that justice is served only when all parties adhere to the rules and case law that govern our criminal justice system. While the department meets its discovery obligations in nearly all cases, even one failure is one too many and we will continue to work with our prosecutors to ensure they have all the support and resources they need to do their jobs. But it would be an injustice of a different kind for the thousands of men and women who spend their lives fighting to uphold the law and keep our communities safe to be tainted by the misguided notion that instances of intentional prosecutorial misconduct are anything but rare occurrences."

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