"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Remember The Debt Ceiling Debate? It's Back

May 23, 2012
Originally published on May 23, 2012 7:22 pm

A storm is brewing in Washington that could darken political debate for months to come. It's about the debt, the deficit, taxes and spending — all hot topics lawmakers have been fighting about for years now.

This time, though, there's a deadline, and the consequences of inaction would be immediate. That has many in Washington saying: Here we go again.

In the past week, President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner have begun a new round of sparring over the U.S. debt ceiling.

That's the limit on the country's line of credit — a limit that lawmakers have set and raised dozens of times over the years, as the federal government has spent more than it has taken in.

When Boehner and the GOP took the House majority at the beginning of 2011, the speaker laid down a new principle: Republicans would not pass an increase in the debt limit unless an equal amount was cut from the budget. And, they said, they would not consider tax increases on the wealthy as a way to fix the deficit.

The partisan fighting that followed was among the most acrimonious, bitter and biting debate many in Washington can remember.

Now, fast-forward to last week, and a speech Boehner gave to the Peterson Foundation's 2012 Fiscal Summit.

"In my view, the debt limit exists precisely so that government is forced to address its fiscal issues," Boehner said.

Boehner, an Ohio Republican, told the hundreds of economists, policy experts and political operatives present that he is sticking to those principles — and, furthermore, he will demand a vote on the debt ceiling before this fall's elections.

The Coming Storm

Last summer's debate was a doozy. But in many ways, the approaching crisis is much worse. Lawmakers have passed so many temporary bills in recent years that an almost unbelievable number of issues come to a head all on the same day: Jan. 1, 2013.

If Washington doesn't act by that day, tax rates will shoot up for everyone. Huge, indiscriminate cuts in military and domestic programs will take place. And, shortly after that, the nation will again hit the debt ceiling, putting into doubt whether the government can pay its bills.

In his fiscal policy speech, Boehner said: "Previous Congresses have encountered lesser precipices with lower stakes and made a beeline for the closest lame-duck escape hatch. Let me put your mind at ease. This Congress will not follow that path, if I have anything to do with it."

The response from the Obama administration? "We're not going to re-create the debt ceiling debacle of last August," White House spokesman Jay Carney said. "It is simply not acceptable to hold the American and global economy hostage to one party's political ideology."

'A Pretty Disparate Caucus'

Perhaps the biggest sticking point in last summer's negotiations was a split among House Republicans themselves. Dozens of them had been elected only months before, many promising to carry their strict conservative principles to Washington. Compromise was not their plan. And even when the speaker and the president came close to a broadly applauded deal, a critical number of Republicans refused to vote for it.

On ABC on Sunday, Boehner acknowledged this friction still exists in his party.

"You know, I've never been shy about leading," he said. "But leaders need followers. And we've got 89 brand-new members, we've got a pretty disparate caucus, and it's hard to keep 218 frogs in a wheelbarrow long enough to get a bill passed."

Boehner said it's not a bad thing that House Republicans want him to go further.

"I want to do more, too. But Republicans are still a minority here in Washington," he said. "Democrats control the Senate, we've got a Democrat in the White House, and our members are pretty frustrated."

And this may be the real point here. Rather than having to compromise on spending, taxes and a debt deal going forward, Boehner and House Republicans would like to find a way to get their principles enshrined in law. And the only way to do that is to change the political makeup of the government itself.

So while they will talk about this issue a lot in the coming months, real solutions aren't likely to come before Election Day.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A storm is brewing in Washington, one that could darken political debate for months to come. It's about the debt, the deficit, taxes and spending - issues lawmakers have been fighting about for years now. This time, though, there's a deadline.

As NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports, the consequences of inaction would be immediate. And that has many in Washington are saying...

ANDREA SEABROOK, BYLINE: Here we go again. In the past week, President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner have begun a new round of sparring over the U.S. debt ceiling. That's the limit on the country's line of credit, a limit that lawmakers have set and raised dozens of times over the years, as the federal government has spent more than it's taken in.

When John Boehner and the GOP took the House majority at the beginning of 2011, the speaker laid down a new principle: Republicans would not pass an increase in the debt limit unless an equal amount of dollars were cut from the budget. And they said they would not consider tax increases on the wealthy as a way to fix the deficit.

The partisan fighting that followed was among the most acrimonious, bitter, and biting debates many in Washington can remember.

Now, fast forward to last week and a speech Boehner gave to the Peterson Foundation's 2012 Fiscal Summit.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: In my view, the debt limit exists precisely so that government is forced to address its fiscal issues.

SEABROOK: Boehner told the hundreds of economists, policy experts and political operatives present that he is sticking to those principals and, furthermore, he will demand a vote on the debt ceiling before this fall's elections.

Last summer's debate was a doozy, but in many ways, the approaching crisis is much worse. Lawmakers have passed so many temporary bills in recent years that an almost unbelievable number of problems come to a head all on the same day, January 1st, 2013. If Washington doesn't act by that day, tax rates will shoot up for everyone, huge indiscriminate cuts in military and domestic programs will take place and, shortly after that, the nation will again hit the debt ceiling, putting into doubt whether the government can pay its bills.

Said Boehner in his fiscal policy speech...

BOEHNER: Now, previous Congresses have encountered lesser precipices with lower stakes and made a beeline for the closest lame duck escape hatch. Let me put your mind at ease. This Congress will not follow that path if I have anything to do with it.

SEABROOK: To which, the Obama administration responded...

JAY CARNEY: We're not going to recreate the debt ceiling debacle of last August.

SEABROOK: White House spokesman Jay Carney.

CARNEY: It is simply not acceptable to hold the American and global economy hostage to one party's political ideology.

SEABROOK: Now, perhaps the biggest sticking point to last summer's negotiations was a split among House Republicans themselves. Dozens of them had been elected only months before, many promising to carry their strict conservative principles to Washington.

Compromise was not their plan and, even when the speaker and president came close to a broadly applauded deal, a critical number of Republicans refused to vote for it.

On ABC this past Sunday, Boehner acknowledged this friction still exists in his party.

You know, I've never been shy about leading, but you know, leaders need followers and we've got 89 brand new members. We've got a pretty disparate caucus and it's hard to keep 218 frogs in a wheelbarrow long enough to get a bill passed.

Boehner said it's not a bad thing that House Republicans want him to go further, to do more.

BOEHNER: I want to do more, too, but Republicans are still a minority here in Washington. They got - the Democrats control the Senate. We've got a Democrat in the White House and our members are pretty frustrated.

SEABROOK: This may be the real point here. Rather than having to compromise on spending, taxes and a debt deal going forward, Boehner and House Republicans would like to find a way to get their principles enshrined in law, and the only way to do that is to change the political makeup of the government itself. So, while they'll talk about this issue a lot in the coming months, real solutions won't likely come before election day.

Andrea Seabrook, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.